Crossword dictionary – Phuut Thai http://phuutthai.com/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 17:12:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://phuutthai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-5-120x120.png Crossword dictionary – Phuut Thai http://phuutthai.com/ 32 32 The Macquarie dictionary announces its word of the year 2021 https://phuutthai.com/the-macquarie-dictionary-announces-its-word-of-the-year-2021/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 00:15:55 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/the-macquarie-dictionary-announces-its-word-of-the-year-2021/ Today, the Macquarie Dictionary named “strollout” as its official word of the year for 2021. Wait, hasn’t “stroll” already been chosen as the word of the year?Yes, but it was a different dictionary. On Wednesday November 17, the Australian National Dictionary Center (ANDC) named its word of the year for 2021 “ambulation”, drawing attention to […]]]>

Today, the Macquarie Dictionary named “strollout” as its official word of the year for 2021.

Wait, hasn’t “stroll” already been chosen as the word of the year?
Yes, but it was a different dictionary. On Wednesday November 17, the Australian National Dictionary Center (ANDC) named its word of the year for 2021 “ambulation”, drawing attention to the deployment of the Covid-19 vaccine at the rate of the federal government’s snail. Now Australia’s most used dictionary has picked the same word, after last year’s choice, “doomscrolling”.

The Macquarie Committee says the ‘walk’ and ‘roll out’ coat rack is easy to understand and ‘is a really important marker for this period in Australian history’.

Who said it first?
Sally McManus, secretary of the Australian Council of Trade Unions, is said to be the first person to use the term, which she tweeted in May 2021 about the slow distribution of vaccines for elderly and disabled care workers. She said: “We don’t have a vaccine deployment, we have a vaccine deployment.” 702 ABC Drive host Richard Glover is credited with spreading the word abroad, writing an article for the Washington post titled “Australian vaccine release shows dangers of Covid complacency.”

What is the audience saying?
Surprisingly, “strollout” is also this year’s People’s Choice winner. This is only the second time in the history of the Macquarie Dictionary Word of the Year that the committee and the voting public have agreed. “The popularity of the word is undoubtedly influenced by this Australian irony evident in its construction,” said the Mac, in a statement.

What other words were up for grabs?
Nineteen words were shortlisted, with the Mac committee giving honorable mention to “Delta”, which says “is not an inventive word, but this variant has dominated our lives”; as well as “menty-b”, which means “deterioration of mental health”. This one was also the People’s Choice finalist. “It’s an easy way to get into an important discussion,” the committee said.

“Last chance tourism” was also in the running, ie “tourism to places with endangered landscapes or geological features, or which are habitats for endangered species”. The Mac said the word evoked a “shared concern and dilemma” about the climate crisis. “Sober curious”, “dry scooping” – shout at TikTok – and “wokescold” were also part of the shortlist, which you can read in full. here.

Who decides on Macquarie’s word of the year?
Each year, the Mac selects a committee to discuss new words and definitions that have entered the dictionary over the past year. For 2021, the committee included radio host and crossword creator David Astle; professor of linguistics at the University of Sydney Nick Enfield; award-winning author and professor of creative writing at Curtin Kim Scott University; Tiger Webb, language research specialist on ABC; and Macquarie Dictionary Editors Victoria Morgan and Alison Moore.

macquariedictionary.com.au


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Anne Bradford, author and cruciverbalist who designed the first dictionary for crossword solvers – obituaries https://phuutthai.com/anne-bradford-author-and-cruciverbalist-who-designed-the-first-dictionary-for-crossword-solvers-obituaries/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 15:40:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/anne-bradford-author-and-cruciverbalist-who-designed-the-first-dictionary-for-crossword-solvers-obituaries/ In 1973, she won the National Scrabble Championship. However, she never won the Times Crossword Championship, despite being a runner-up on several occasions. During the war she was evacuated to Alnwick in Northumberland, where she did so well in school that she was transferred to a grade with girls three years older than her. She […]]]>

In 1973, she won the National Scrabble Championship. However, she never won the Times Crossword Championship, despite being a runner-up on several occasions.

During the war she was evacuated to Alnwick in Northumberland, where she did so well in school that she was transferred to a grade with girls three years older than her. She has become the head girl.

After studying social sciences at King’s College Newcastle, then part of Durham University, she worked in an employment agency. In 1952 she married Francis Bradford, with whom she moved to north London, where he worked for BP. While their children were young, she worked from home and ran the part-time women’s employment agency at the university.

She later spent 21 years as a part-time secretary at a north London preparatory school, worked as a volunteer tutor in adult arithmetic and, in her eighties, volunteered in the books section of ‘a charitable palliative care store.

Her favorite crossword, she told The Lady magazine in 2013, included: “Pineapple rings in syrup (9)” (answer: grenadine); “Information given to the Communist in exchange for sex (6)” (response: gender) and “Cake-sandwiches-meat, at Uncle Sam’s party (8)” (response: Clambake).

Telegraph readers who cannot spot connections clearly need Bradford Crossword Solver’s dictionary.

Anne Bradford’s husband died in 2013 and a daughter also died before her. She is survived by two daughters and a son.

Anne Bradford, born November 3, 1930, died October 30, 2021


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Do you speak elephant? With this new dictionary, you https://phuutthai.com/do-you-speak-elephant-with-this-new-dictionary-you/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/do-you-speak-elephant-with-this-new-dictionary-you/ An ambitious repertoire of elephant behaviors and vocalizations offers amazing insight into their minds and culture – and could help save these magnificent beasts from extinction Life November 3, 2021 Through Laura Spinney A young man shakes his head, announcing he is in musth, a period of increased libido ElephantVoice A HERD of around 40 […]]]>

An ambitious repertoire of elephant behaviors and vocalizations offers amazing insight into their minds and culture – and could help save these magnificent beasts from extinction

Life


November 3, 2021

A young man shakes his head, announcing he is in musth, a period of increased libido

ElephantVoice

A HERD of around 40 elephants roam the open grasslands of Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique. Led by a matriarch named Valente, they make their way to a newly felled tree, a potential source of food. The tree is out of sight: maybe the elephants have sensed vibrations of the impact through their feet. It’s cool, and the procession is impressive – but elephant scientist Joyce Poole doesn’t know why this particular video has gone viral. Since May, she and her husband Petter Granli have been posting elephant clips on social media daily, and others are much cuter or weirder.

The duo are co-founders of a US-based nonprofit called ElephantVoice, and these videos are part of a project they’ve been working on for the past five years. Called the Elephant ethogram, this is a free online library of elephant behaviors and vocalizations, and their meanings. Since it went live, Poole and Granli have been inundated with messages expressing wonder and gratitude.

This shouldn’t come as a surprise. The human desire to decipher other animals is ancient, and science has recently brought that dream closer – for example, through the use of artificial intelligence to start decoding the vocalizations of whales and birds. The Ethogram Elephant is less flashy, but much more impressive. Andrew Whiten, who studies animal behavior at the University of St Andrews in the UK, calls this a “staggering achievement”. It is probably the most ambitious ethogram ever created. In addition to giving …


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National Dictionary Day: Surprising Facts About The Resource Book https://phuutthai.com/national-dictionary-day-surprising-facts-about-the-resource-book/ https://phuutthai.com/national-dictionary-day-surprising-facts-about-the-resource-book/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/national-dictionary-day-surprising-facts-about-the-resource-book/ Saturday is National Dictionary Day and what better way to celebrate than to learn some facts about the reference book? The United States celebrates National Dictionary Day on October 16 each year in honor of the birthday of Noah Webster, considered the father of the American dictionary, according to Merriam webster. According to the dictionary […]]]>

Saturday is National Dictionary Day and what better way to celebrate than to learn some facts about the reference book?

The United States celebrates National Dictionary Day on October 16 each year in honor of the birthday of Noah Webster, considered the father of the American dictionary, according to Merriam webster.

According to the dictionary website, National Dictionary Day “celebrates the language, emphasizes the importance of learning, and encourages readers to use the dictionary to improve their vocabulary.”

Saturday is National Dictionary Day. The United States celebrates the holiday on October 16 each year in honor of Noah Webster’s birthday. Webster is considered the father of the American dictionary. (iStock)

The website has ways to celebrate, including playing word games like crossword puzzles or word searches, hosting a spelling contest, or learning a new word.

You can also celebrate by reading these interesting facts on the dictionary.

A RARE COPY OF THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION AT AUCTION IS EXPECTED AT $ 15M

The first English language dictionary was established in 1604

Robert Cawdry published “A Table Alphabeticall” in 1604, making it the “first monolingual English dictionary ever published”, according to the British Library. The resource book contained approximately 3,000 words and “short, simple descriptions”.

The first English language dictionary was published in 1604 and the first American dictionary was published in 1806. (iStock)

The first English language dictionary was published in 1604 and the first American dictionary was published in 1806. (iStock)

The first American dictionary – “A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language” – was published in 1806 by Noah Webster, according to the Merriam Webster website.

In 1828 Webster published “An American Dictionary of the English Language,” which had 70,000 entries.

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No English dictionary contains all the words of the English language

According to Merriam-Webster, it is silly to rely on a single dictionary to hold all the words in the English language, even though dictionaries “tend to be quite large books.”

“There never was, and never will be, a dictionary that includes all words in English,” Merriam-Webster said on her website.

According to the dictionary, some dictionaries omit words that are outdated or irrelevant to most people.

Microscopic pneumonoultramilicovolcanoconiosis is generally considered to be the longest word in the English language, with 45 letters.  (iStock)

Microscopic pneumonoultramilicovolcanoconiosis is generally considered to be the longest word in the English language, with 45 letters. (iStock)

Words are not decided by lexicographers

According to Merriam Webster website, different dictionaries have different criteria for adding words. However, the general rule for adding or removing a word from the dictionary depends on the data surrounding how often a word is used.

“If enough people use a certain word in a certain way for a while (or if it has substantial currency in a particular field, like medicine), it will be added to a dictionary,” writes Merriam-Webster on its website. .

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The longest word in the English language has 45 letters

Microscopic pneumonoultramilicovolcanoconiosis is generally considered to be the longest word in the English language, with 45 letters. The word refers to lung disease, according to Lexicon.

Other words considered to be among the longest in the dictionary are anti-disestablishmentarianism (a 28-letter word referring to “opposition to a break with an established church”, according to Dictionary.com) and floccinaucinihilipilification (a 29 letter word meaning “the estimation of something as worthless”, according to Dictionary.com).

Eunoia, which means "nice thought" according to Guinness World Records, is the shortest word in the English language which has the five main vowels.  (iStock)

Eunoia, which means “beautiful thought” according to Guinness World Records, is the shortest word in the English language which has all five main vowels. (iStock)

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The shortest word with the five vowels in the English language is only 6 letters long

Eunoia, which means “beautiful thought” according to Guinness World Records, is the shortest word in the English language which has the five main vowels.

Of course, the two shortest words in the entire English language are “I” and “a”, with only one letter each. According to Lexicon, there are 103 two-letter words.


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Humor by Rehana Munir: D is for dictionary https://phuutthai.com/humor-by-rehana-munir-d-is-for-dictionary/ https://phuutthai.com/humor-by-rehana-munir-d-is-for-dictionary/#respond Sun, 12 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/humor-by-rehana-munir-d-is-for-dictionary/ One of the sweetest pleasures in life is finding an old love. I’m currently enjoying the rebirth of one of those romances, with a well-dressed Oxford charmer whose linguistic brilliance reduces me to a cheerful idiot. I now know what a Mr. Tharoor feels like. The attractions of a pocket dictionary, the kind you wear […]]]>

One of the sweetest pleasures in life is finding an old love. I’m currently enjoying the rebirth of one of those romances, with a well-dressed Oxford charmer whose linguistic brilliance reduces me to a cheerful idiot. I now know what a Mr. Tharoor feels like. The attractions of a pocket dictionary, the kind you wear to bed, are not to be laughed at. They are to be delicately savored like an elaborate cerebral striptease conducted only for your gratification.

High on knowledge

I wouldn’t call myself a “sapiosexual” – someone turned on by intelligence – although, of course, that helps. But losing myself in this voluminous edition reveals how much I depend on language for more than just basic communication. Language is an ever-expanding playground, and a dictionary is full of unauthorized pleasures. Its alphabet format – a beautiful word which means classified in alphabetical order – simply gives it an air of order and decorum. In reality, he is a devilish and mythical being, the keeper of all words and therefore the holder of all possibilities.

Forgive me for soaring, but like the Alice in Wonderland caterpillar sitting on a mushroom, smoking a hookah, I too feel pretty high. And to think that I had despised the right book for the convenience of a digital dictionary all these years. I’m eternally grateful for everything internet related, but lately I’ve been uncomfortable typing unfamiliar words on my phone while reading a physical book. While walking, speaking or more generally while living, I find the digressions delicious. And a physical dictionary is a space where all kinds of intellectual wanderings become possible. You might not know where you are going in there, but you are still safe in its pages.

The verbose Mr. Johnson

My mind goes to Samuel Johnson, the most famous lexicographer in Western history. A man from the Renaissance to the Age of Enlightenment, his keen intelligence and vast knowledge led him to create A Dictionary of the English Language in 1755, the prototype of the dictionaries we still use today. And as anyone who’s taken more than three pub quizzes will tell you, it’s usually the answer to any question about the 18th century. My all-time favorite quote from the wise and wise man remains: “Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel.”

But like everyone else, he too was a product of his time and his social class. A devout Anglican and a member of the ruling elite, his opinions and prejudices have made their way into his lexicography and from there, subliminally, into the minds of countless readers. But then, politics and language have always been intertwined. Today, when a popular website like Dictionary.com uses an awakened voice on social media, it is carrying on an old tradition. Dictionaries can also be read like stories, so it is important to know which voice we allow into our consciousness and why.

A linguistic orgy

For all the joys of getting lost in a maze of printed words, there are real challenges. I am currently reading H is for Hawk, a personal memoir which is exceptionally wise and moving. But author, Helen Macdonald, isn’t one to lead her reader into uncharted territory – and what could be more unknown than a woman training a recalcitrant hawk while mourning her recently deceased father? A science historian, Macdonald uses language that is both broad and precise, and sends me running to my sneaky pocket dictionary every few paragraphs. The volume draws me in with a sufficiently obscure and tantalizing word and the next thing I know I’m caught in a linguistic orgy, pounding like a bird ruffling its feathers after a fight.

I’ll definitely save more time if I stick to a woken up online dictionary, with progressive politics as a bonus. In addition, I will spare myself the sudden panic of encountering words like “isohyet” (a line on a map connecting points with the same amount of precipitation in a given period) or “nudiustertien” (from or related to the day before yesterday). ), strangers who approach you when you browse familiar pages. As always, I choose recklessness. This sneaky dictionary has me in his pocket.

rehanamunir@gmail.com

Follow @rehana_munir on Twitter and Instagram

From Brunch HT, September 12, 2021

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Anti-vaxxer, willy-waver and Wagwan among new Oxford dictionary words – see list https://phuutthai.com/anti-vaxxer-willy-waver-and-wagwan-among-new-oxford-dictionary-words-see-list/ https://phuutthai.com/anti-vaxxer-willy-waver-and-wagwan-among-new-oxford-dictionary-words-see-list/#respond Thu, 09 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/anti-vaxxer-willy-waver-and-wagwan-among-new-oxford-dictionary-words-see-list/ Long Covid, snackette and bath bombs are also among the new entries in the Oxford English Dictionary but it is the pandemic that has had a big effect on the language this year Anti-vaccine protests at Clapham Common ( Image: Ian Vogler / Daily Mirror) The word anti-vaxxer entered the Oxford English Dictionary, but it […]]]>

Long Covid, snackette and bath bombs are also among the new entries in the Oxford English Dictionary but it is the pandemic that has had a big effect on the language this year

Anti-vaccine protests at Clapham Common

The word anti-vaxxer entered the Oxford English Dictionary, but it took 209 years and a pandemic to get there.

Long Covid has also done this, but it’s only been around since May 2020, when it was first used in a tweet.

The 837 new entrees also include the funniest snack, for a bite, and bath bombs, another old one, that American stores were selling in 1927.

But an OED spokeswoman said: “World events have a big impact on the language and this update is no exception.”

Anti-vaxxer is used to describe someone who refuses the Covid vaccine, but it was invented in 1812 by Edward Jenner when his smallpox injection met with fierce opposition.

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Disaster capitalism, to profit from disasters, suppressing voters, preventing people from going to the polls, and the once taboo subject of menstrual poverty are also new entries.

The OED spokeswoman said: “They all, somewhat depressingly, saw enough evidence of use for them to fit into the dictionary.”

Wagwan?

Anti-vaxxer – a person opposed to vaccination

Bants – short for joking and denotes teasing or upbeat remarks used in social circles

Bath Bomb – a scented, shaped bath product that dissolves in water

Big-tech – a collection of large multinational technology companies

Brown nose – suck someone and stroke them to gain their favor

Disaster capitalism – exploitation of natural or man-made disasters such as extreme weather events, war and epidemics




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Ghosting – being masked on social media and not receiving a response to messages, signaling the sudden end of a friendship or relationship

Long Covid – persistence of symptoms linked to Covid-19

Love locks – a padlock attached to a bridge, railing or fence by a couple as a symbol of their love and commitment

Noise reduction – a device such as a headset that has technology to suppress background noise and chatter

Menstrual poverty – not having the means to buy sanitary products

Snackette – a small snack




Snooze – to activate the snooze function on an alarm clock or device

Elimination of voters – to prevent people, especially those belonging to certain demographic groups, from voting in elections

Wagwan – a short way to ask “what’s going on? “

Willy-waver – a boastful, self-proclaimed badass who shows inordinate amounts of machismo


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Launch of the very first South African language dictionary Kaaps – why it matters https://phuutthai.com/launch-of-the-very-first-south-african-language-dictionary-kaaps-why-it-matters/ https://phuutthai.com/launch-of-the-very-first-south-african-language-dictionary-kaaps-why-it-matters/#respond Mon, 30 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/launch-of-the-very-first-south-african-language-dictionary-kaaps-why-it-matters/ It has been around since the 1500s but the Kaaps language, synonymous with Cape Town in South Africa, has never had a dictionary until now. The trilingual dictionary of Kaaps has been spear by a collective of academic and community actors – the Center for research on multilingualism and diversity at the University of the […]]]>

It has been around since the 1500s but the Kaaps language, synonymous with Cape Town in South Africa, has never had a dictionary until now. The trilingual dictionary of Kaaps has been spear by a collective of academic and community actors – the Center for research on multilingualism and diversity at the University of the Western Cape with the hip hop community NGO Heal the Hood Project. The dictionary – in Kaaps, English and Afrikaans – promises to be a powerful democratic resource. Adam Haupt, director of the Center for Film & Media Studies at the University of Cape Town, is involved in the project and tells us more.


What is Kaaps and who uses the language?

Kaaps or Afrikaaps is a language created in the colonial South Africa of the settlers, developed in the 1500s. It took shape as a language during meetings between indigenous Africans (Khoi and San), Southeast Asians, Dutch, Portuguese and English . It could be argued that Kaaps predates the emergence of an early form of Kaaps-Hollands (the South African variety of Dutch that is said to help shape Afrikaans). Traders and sailors would have crossed this region long before the start of official colonization. Also consider migration and displacement on the African continent itself. Each intercultural engagement would have created an opportunity for linguistic exchange and negotiation of a new meaning.

Today, Kaaps is most commonly used by largely working class speakers on the Cape Flats, an area of ​​Cape Town where many disenfranchised people have been forcibly displaced by the apartheid government. It is used in all online and offline contexts of socialization, learning, business, politics and religion. And, due to language contact and the temporary and seasonal migration of Western Cape speakers, it is written and spoken across South Africa and beyond its borders.

It is important to recognize the action of the people of the South in the development of the Kaaps – for example, the language was first taught in madrasas (Islamic schools) and was written in Arabic script. This recognition is imperative, all the more so as Afrikaner nationalists have appropriated Kaaps in recent years.

For a great discussion of Kaaps and the explanation of example words and phrases from this language, listen this conversation between academic Quentin Williams and journalist Lester Kiewit.

How did the dictionary come about?

The dictionary project, still in the launch phase, is the result of permanent collaborative work between a few key people. You could say this is one of the results of our interest in hip hop art, activism and education. We are drawn to hip hop’s desire to validate black modes of speech. In a sense, that’s what a dictionary will do for Kaaps.

Quentin Williams, sociolinguist, leads the project. Emile Jansen, Tanswell Jansen and Shaquile Southgate sit on the Editorial Board on behalf of Heal the cap Project, which is an NGO that uses hip-hop education in youth development initiatives. Emile has also worked with hip hop and theater practitioners on a production called Afrikaaps, who claimed Kaaps and told part of his story. Anthropologist H. Samy Alim is the founding director of the Center for race, ethnicity, and language at Stanford University and helped fund the dictionary, along with the Western Cape Department of Cultural Affairs and Sports.

CD art from the musical Afrikaaps.
Courtesy of Afrikaaps / Dylan Valley

We are in the process of forming the main editorial board in the scientific area of ​​lexicography, translation and transcription. This includes archiving the initial structured corpus for the dictionary. We will write definitions and determine the meanings of the old and new Kaaps words. This process will go through rigorous scrutiny and a process of editing and styling the Kaaps words that we enter into the dictionary. Entries will include their history of origin, use and adoption. There will also be a translation from Afrikaans and Standard English.

Who will use the dictionary?

It will be a resource for its lecturers and invaluable for educators, students and researchers. This will have an impact on how institutions, as places of power, engage Kaaps speakers. It would also be useful for journalists, editors and editors who want to know more about how to engage Kaaps speakers.

A Kaaps dictionary will validate it as a full language. And it will validate the identity of the people who speak it. It will also help to make visible the various cultural, linguistic, geographical and historical tributaries that have contributed to the evolution of this language.

Has Kaaps been relegated to Afrikaans slang status?

Recognition of the Kaaps is imperative especially because Afrikaner nationalists have appropriated the Kaaps in order to create the dominant version of the language in the form of Afrikaans. A ‘to follow‘or’ pure ‘version, claiming a strong Dutch influence, Afrikaans was formally recognized as the official language of South Africa in 1925. It was part of efforts to build white afrikaner identity, who shaped aside based on a belief in white supremacy.

For example, think of the Kaaps tradition of koesiesters – fried dough confectionery – which was appropriated (taken without recognition) and the treats were named koek sisters by white Afrikaners. They have been claimed as a white Afrikaner tradition. The appropriation of Kaaps speaks volumes about the extent to which the race is socially and politically constructed. As I have said somewhere else, cultural appropriation is both the expression of and is made possible by unequal power relations.

When people think of Kaaps, they often regard him as “mixed” or “unclean” (‘supervisor‘). It has to do with how they view “racial” identity. They often think of colored identity as “mixed”, implying that black and white identities are “pure” and limited; that they only become “mixed up” during “interracial” sexual encounters. This way of thinking is biologically essentialist.

Of course, geneticists now know that there is not enough genetic variation between “races” to warrant biologically essentialist understandings. Enter cultural racism to strengthen the concept of “race”. It controls culture and insists on standard linguistic varieties by denigrating often black speech patterns such as “slang” or marginal dialects.

Can a dictionary help overturn stereotypes?

Visibility and the politics of representation are key challenges for Kaaps speakers – whether in the media, which has done a great job of taunting and stereotyping Kaaps speakers – or in engaging these speakers with the speakers. government and educational institutions. If Kaaps is not recognized as a bona fide language, you will continue to see classroom scenarios where school children are explicitly told that the way they speak is not ‘respectable’ and will not guarantee them success in their career pursuit.

This dictionary project, like those of other South African languages ​​like isiXhosa, isiZulu or Sesotho, can be a great democratic resource for developing understanding in a country that continues to be racially divided and unequal.

Adam haupt,, University of Cape Town

This article is republished from The conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read it original article.
The conversation


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Mike Richards mocked Dictionary’s Twitter account after Jeopardy! saga https://phuutthai.com/mike-richards-mocked-dictionarys-twitter-account-after-jeopardy-saga/ https://phuutthai.com/mike-richards-mocked-dictionarys-twitter-account-after-jeopardy-saga/#respond Fri, 20 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/mike-richards-mocked-dictionarys-twitter-account-after-jeopardy-saga/ Mike Richards was mocked by Dictionary.com’s Twitter account after he stepped down from his role as Danger! host. The Twitter profile, which has nearly 400,000 followers, posted: “’Jeopardy’ is a name meaning ‘peril or danger’. Here it is in one sentence: “My job is in danger because of my past comments. ” Richards was heralded […]]]>

Mike Richards was mocked by Dictionary.com’s Twitter account after he stepped down from his role as Danger! host.

The Twitter profile, which has nearly 400,000 followers, posted: “’Jeopardy’ is a name meaning ‘peril or danger’. Here it is in one sentence: “My job is in danger because of my past comments. ”

Richards was heralded as the new Danger! host on Aug. 11, but has since resigned in response to his past sexist comments, for which he apologized earlier this week.

He announced his resignation from his post in a memo to staff today (August 20).

“I will be leaving my host position from now on. As a result, we will be canceling production today, ”Richards wrote.

He continued, “I would like to apologize to all of you for the unwanted negative attention that has been paid to Danger! over the past few weeks and for the confusion and delays it is causing now.

“I know I have a lot of work to do to regain your trust.”

Richards had previously been accused of discriminating against pregnant women and of “acting in questionable ways” with women who were expecting. He denied any wrongdoing in a note to Danger! members of staff earlier this month.

He was only to be the second guest of Danger! after previous host Alex Trebek died of cancer in November 2020.


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Family tries to enter dictionary to ‘orbisculate’ to honor father who died from Covid-19 https://phuutthai.com/family-tries-to-enter-dictionary-to-orbisculate-to-honor-father-who-died-from-covid-19/ https://phuutthai.com/family-tries-to-enter-dictionary-to-orbisculate-to-honor-father-who-died-from-covid-19/#respond Sat, 27 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/family-tries-to-enter-dictionary-to-orbisculate-to-honor-father-who-died-from-covid-19/ “I was trying to tell people about my dad and how really funny, creative and very original he was and could still see the humor and the bright side of the situation. I kept coming back to the word orbisculate as a way to capture that, “Neil’s daughter Hilary Krieger told CNN. “There’s something about […]]]>

“I was trying to tell people about my dad and how really funny, creative and very original he was and could still see the humor and the bright side of the situation. I kept coming back to the word orbisculate as a way to capture that, “Neil’s daughter Hilary Krieger told CNN. “There’s something about the creation of that word that makes it look like he’s captured it and it was really fun.”

The quest to get into the dictionary is more about the journey than the destination, which her father would appreciate, Hilary said. It’s a fitting way to remember his father – a former scientist – and find a way to be close to him.

Mourning, loss, Covid-19 and the joy of a silly word come together to unite people at a time of such sad news.

While Hilary, 44, an NBC News opinion writer and former CNN digital editor, and her brother, Jonathan Krieger, who runs a company that hosts virtual quiz nights, are busy with their jobs, the project orbisculate their gave a way to do something positive for the world.

How not to laugh when you hear it in a sentence?

“I made a mistake dressing up before I ate a grapefruit. It ended up orbiting on my shirt and now I have to change,” Jonathan said, as an example.

Orbisculate was born in upstate New York

When Neil Krieger was a freshman at Cornell University in the late 1950s, he was asked to invent a word for a class assignment.

Orbisculate was born.

Krieger, who later became a researcher and started a biotech consulting company, loved this strange word so much that he used it with his two children and his wife.

“Growing up in the house, I just assumed it was a real word,” Hilary said.

Hilary said she was taken aback when a friend from college told her it wasn’t a real word.

They were eating oranges at the Krieger family house when they were in their twenties and Hilary said, “Oh, that orbiculated you.” After he questioned the word, she added, “Orbisculate, you know, when fruit squirts all over you.”

Embarrassed that her writer friend didn’t know this “fantastic word,” Hilary bet her $ 5 that it was in the dictionary.

“We opened the dictionary and I couldn’t believe it wasn’t there,” Hilary said. “I was so in shock.”

She rushed into her father’s office after the word failed to appear in the American Heritage Dictionary. Her father met her with a “sheepish look” and explained to her that he had made it up.

Demoralized, Hilary left the room. But she continued to use the word with her friends.

They couldn’t cry the usual way

Hilary’s father tested positive for Covid-19 at the end of March 2020. He suffered from chronic kidney disease and was on dialysis. His family were terrified of what Covid-19 would do to them.

Devastated, Hilary called her mother, Susan. Somehow, the only way her mother felt better about the test result was after talking to her husband.

Neil told his 47-year-old wife it was really a good thing, his daughter said. Hospitals were not at full capacity, and he had the best medical care in Boston.

After a month in the hospital, Neil was failing and his family came to his intensive care room. Their father died the next morning, April 29, from respiratory failure and complications from Covid-19, according to medical records. He was 78 years old.

“We couldn’t be there at the end of the normal way, just all that stuff that makes the worst thing in your life even worse,” Hilary said.

Neil Krieger toast Hilary Krieger's Bat Mitzvah in Boston.

The family had a small private funeral, but that was not how they wanted to remember him. They did not have the opportunity to praise him or have a shiva, the Jewish tradition of inviting anyone who knows the mourners to stop for seven days.

They were planning to hold a larger event for the first anniversary of his death, but that seems unlikely due to the ongoing pandemic. This made the orbisculate project much more important to the family.

“We really liked that it was kind of a non-traditional way to honor someone and commemorate them hoping other people find ways to do it,” Hilary said.

It became a way to remember Neil Krieger’s legacy of being upbeat and always positive, his daughter said.

“It’s just fun, it’s light, and it’s something that I think people could use right now, as opposed to something that gets a little more serious,” said Jonathan, 35.

50 goals to try to put it in the dictionary

Putting a word in the dictionary is harder than you might think.

Just because people are tweeting about the orbisculate project, or writing about it online, doesn’t mean the word will get around.

The siblings try to fit the coined word into any dictionary, but it’s a long process. So far it has graced the online theaters of Urban dictionary.

The word potential is to be used in the common vernacular in several ways. If people use it when speaking, and the word is used in different places, dictionary editors are more likely to consider adding it.

“If it was used in a book and a screenplay, and on the radio, it would make it more likely than if it was just used on one of those three platforms,” Jonathan said.

He found ways to have fun by spreading the word. The orbiculate website, which is part of the effort to admit the word in the dictionary, has a list of 50 goals to help use the word in different places and to encourage people to have fun in these weird times.

So far, orbisculate has adorned crossword puzzles, a comic book, and it has been carved on a grapefruit spoon.

The siblings are hoping that the word will be used in a song, preferably written by Lin-Manuel Miranda, or that some celebrities with citrus names will use it. Cue “Don Lemon, CNN presenter, 30 Rock fictional character Liz Lemon, or Syracuse University mascot Otto the Orange,” the website says.

Or you can always sign the petition to put the word in the dictionary. About 500 people have signed it so far, according to Hilary.

The word is so visual that t-shirts showing what the word means, complete with a piece of cartoon citrus, are also on sale. All the money goes to charity, say the siblings.

The $ 2,500 raised so far will be used to The village of Carson, a Dallas nonprofit that supports families who have suffered the loss of a loved one.

The Krieger family had the means to deal with funeral arrangements and other issues following the death of a loved one, Jonathan said.

“For us it was really difficult. We can only imagine how difficult it is for others,” he said. “If that money could go to an organization that helps people after the loss of a loved one, we thought it would be something really special.”

What would their father think?

Somehow, the word orbisculate connects people with different reasons for loving the word squirty.

Some people identify with themselves because their families invented words. Others are simply logophiles. People have told siblings that they have lost their father as well, and there are some who are just happy to have joy during the pandemic.

After reading all the headlines and seeing line charts with the death toll, Jonathan wants people to remember those who died from Covid-19 deserve to be honored for the way they lived.

“It’s important that we don’t let it be that number, and that we remove it with the things that we remember and want to share with the world about the people we love, and that’s what keeps them going. life, ”he said.

For Jonathan and Hilary, it’s remembering their dad loved to celebrate life’s good times and bad – again, it was all about the trip.

Neil, Susan, Hilary and Jonathan Krieger at a family wedding in Rhode Island.

“Our dad was definitely a ‘it’s the trip, not the destination’ guy,” said Hilary. “He hasn’t lived his life for the destination at all.”

Their father was not the type to receive accolades and awards, or even recognition, she said. Still, getting the word in the dictionary would be like “icing on the cake,” Hilary said.

“I guess at some point if you go online and Google search for the word orbisculate and there it is, on a major website or dictionary, and where it says its origin, it says it has was invented by Neil Krieger, it would be wonderful and so crazy to see my dad live, ”she said.

When asked how his father would react if his children tried to find his word in the dictionary, Hilary replied that he would laugh.

“He would definitely start laughing, there’s no question in my mind,” she said. “The fact that we wanted to do something fun and loved that word and everything it says about how much we love him and miss him would mean the world to him.”


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What’s the word for a word that sends you to the dictionary? https://phuutthai.com/whats-the-word-for-a-word-that-sends-you-to-the-dictionary/ https://phuutthai.com/whats-the-word-for-a-word-that-sends-you-to-the-dictionary/#respond Fri, 05 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/whats-the-word-for-a-word-that-sends-you-to-the-dictionary/ Sanguine. Bathos. Calming. You know these words, but do you really know them? Just like the timid and the palimpsest. Clear and elongated. Bucolic and sequestration. Welcome to the slippery realm of lapsonyms, those words that require a trip in the dictionary. What do you call a word that sends you to the dictionary?Credit:Bonnie Sauvage […]]]>

Sanguine. Bathos. Calming. You know these words, but do you really know them? Just like the timid and the palimpsest. Clear and elongated. Bucolic and sequestration. Welcome to the slippery realm of lapsonyms, those words that require a trip in the dictionary.

What do you call a word that sends you to the dictionary?Credit:Bonnie Sauvage

And not your first check either. Since this is the problem with the lapsonyms; their definitions fail to capture no matter how often you try. Kathryn Schulz, writer of New Yorker, coined the word in 2015, a neologism that has suitably escaped the mainstream traction.

The lapsonym of Schulz was insignificant, synonymous with jejune – mine black beast. More elegant than Teflon, jejune never seems to stick, which is only suitable for a word meaning “lacking in interest or meaning, ie insignificant”. Maybe that’s how I will remember the two words now.

Forgiving is another blind spot, due to the somersaults the verb has to perform in those doorstops that MPs give. You know the scenario. There’s the finance minister in front of the media, saying they don’t approve of the behavior of fund managers, and you wonder if this remark is a rebuke or a defense.

William Safire, another talkative New Yorker, believed that the widespread abuse of apologies only fueled the problem. Most people assume that to tolerate means to approve, as opposed to forgiveness, its true definition. The point is, you can put up with Harry for slapping that crybaby Hugo in Slap her, which is not the same as supporting its action. There is a difference.

To confuse the issue, forgive is often phrased in the negative, like our example of a doorstop, the verb forced to obey one’s shadow. We end up wondering if the minister forgives but does not approve. Or disapproving, but forgiving. Or neither. I’ll have to watch it again.

Aver is another common name, according to my recent Twitter poll. The word means to affirm with confidence, although it lacks a letter of hesitation. This accidental kinship may well epitomize the source of the confusion, just as a word for pardon (excuse) is a pairing of two versions of the scam: con and done. Or edgy, synonymous with sap, is often biased to mean animated because of its semi-energetic openness.

Technical terms are distinguished from general lapsonyms. No one expects you to discover the nuances of syzygy or blockchain whenever such ideas are discussed. Of course, we know the terms. We see them as a silhouette, if not their grainy detail. We know their lockers. But if you need to consult a dictionary, looking for a clearer meaning, it is only for lack of specialized training. Or short my excuse anyway.

Compare that with improve or sinecure, lambent or eponymous: words you come across in books and articles, crosswords and captions. Words you should know because you’ve checked their meanings a dozen times before, but they still laugh, frolicking past your memory bank.


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