Etymological dictionary – Phuut Thai http://phuutthai.com/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 03:18:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://phuutthai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-5-120x120.png Etymological dictionary – Phuut Thai http://phuutthai.com/ 32 32 MHS graduate publishes Appalachian dictionary https://phuutthai.com/mhs-graduate-publishes-appalachian-dictionary/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 16:03:27 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/mhs-graduate-publishes-appalachian-dictionary/ Jennifer (Nelson) Heinmiller, a 2003 graduate of Marysville High School, co-edited a Southern Appalachian Vernacular Dictionary with Dr. Michael B. Montgomery, Emeritus Professor Emeritus of English and Linguistics at the University from South Carolina.“I was involved in the project when I was in graduate school,” said Heinmiller. “I was a research assistant to Dr Michael […]]]>

Jennifer (Nelson) Heinmiller, a 2003 graduate of Marysville High School, co-edited a Southern Appalachian Vernacular Dictionary with Dr. Michael B. Montgomery, Emeritus Professor Emeritus of English and Linguistics at the University from South Carolina.
“I was involved in the project when I was in graduate school,” said Heinmiller. “I was a research assistant to Dr Michael Montgomery, who sadly passed away a few years ago. He was working on the second edition of the “Dictionary of Smoky Mountain English” and he wanted to expand it. “
Heinmiller, who received his BA from Bowling Green State University and his MA in Linguistics from the University of South Carolina-Colombia, joined the project and was named co-author.
Montgomery died in 2019.
“After her passing, I spent a few years bringing the project to fruition and publishing it,” she said.
The “Dictionary of Southern Appalachian English”, which includes over 10,000 entries from over 2,200 sources, was published by The University of North Carolina Press in June.
Heinmiller spent 13 years – Montgomery spent about 18 years – developing the dictionary.
Heinmiller, 36, is a linguist for a financial technology company based in Manhattan, New York.
In addition to her language training, she has a long-standing connection with the culture of the Appalachians.
“I was born in North Carolina and lived in North Carolina (and) South Carolina, and my paternal grandfather is from eastern Tennessee, which is part of the Appalachians,” he said. she declared. “My maternal grandparents – all of them – are from Southeast Ohio, which is sort of the northern part of the Appalachians.”
Heinmiller hopes readers will use the dictionary to connect with their Appalachian roots.
She added that she had “actually received a lot of emails from people with the most wonderful stories” about using the dictionary to understand the history of Appalachian phrases or cuisine.
She also hopes the dictionary will increase knowledge about the Appalachians and end stereotypes about the culture.
The “Dictionary of Southern Appalachian English” is a revised and expanded edition of the “Dictionary of Smoky Mountain English”, which was published in 2005.
According to the Berea College website, the Weatherford Awards are presented annually by the institution and the Appalachian Studies Association.
“The Weatherford Awards recognize books that” best shed light on the challenges, personalities and unique qualities of the Southern Appalachian Mountains. ” The three recognized categories are fiction, non-fiction and poetry.
The “Dictionary of Smoky Mountain English” was based on a body of work by Californian linguist Joseph Hall.
“He carried out a program with the United States government to go and document the language and culture of the inhabitants of the Smoky Mountains, right on the verge of the creation of the national park,” explained Heinmiller.
During the 1930s, Hall filled out field notebooks and made audio recordings to capture the vernacular of the people of Smoky Mountain. With government funding, he compiled data on word usage and grammar.
“In the 1940s, he wrote his doctoral thesis on the phonetics of Smoky Mountain speech,” said Heinmiller.
The “Dictionary of Smoky Mountain English” also referred to various projects emerging from Hall’s research.
According to its synopsis, the “Dictionary of Southern Appalachian English” contains approximately 35,000 citations. About 1,600 of these examples come from letters written by Civil War soldiers and members of their families. 4,000 others are taken from regional oral history recordings.
Heinmiller said she and Montgomery also referred to novels, newspaper articles, magazine articles, scholarly journal publications and music.
“We looked at a newspaper from the 1700s,” she added.
Heinmiller and Montgomery aimed to make this volume “as accessible and appealing to as wide an audience as possible”.
The “Dictionary of Southern Appalachian English” serves as both a historical and academic dictionary with citations, definitions, and etymology.
The dictionary is under review for the American Library Association’s Dartmouth Medal, which is awarded annually to “a reference work of exceptional quality and significance.”
The “Dictionary of Southern Appalachian English” is available in hardcover and electronic edition through The University of North Carolina Press, Amazon, and Barnes & Noble. A copy of the dictionary is also available at the Marysville Public Library, where Heinmiller’s mother, Kim Nelson, is a librarian.
Heinmiller also hosts a dictionary-based podcast called “Appalachian Words,” available on popular platforms, such as Spotify and Apple Podcasts.
“I actually use the dictionary as the basis for the podcast, and each episode has some sort of theme,” she said. “Then I go through and pull a nice selection of words from the dictionary that relate to that theme, and I talk about the definition. Next, I discuss some of the historical examples that we have, and I talk about the sources and years that each example came from and how it is somehow woven into the larger fabric of Appalachian culture, and then to a more large scale in American culture.
In addition, Heinmiller has made appearances on “The Reckon Interview”, “Appalachia Meets World” and “Access Atlanta” podcasts.


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What is the Urban Dictionary “noun trend” and why is it popular? https://phuutthai.com/what-is-the-urban-dictionary-noun-trend-and-why-is-it-popular/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 14:55:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/what-is-the-urban-dictionary-noun-trend-and-why-is-it-popular/ They let the dictionary define them as a person. Urban Dictionary is often seen as a sophomoric source for dirty words, but now bored social media users have tapped into the participatory glossary for something new – to find alternate definitions for their names that aren’t in the list. Oxford English Dictionary. The bizarre name […]]]>

They let the dictionary define them as a person.

Urban Dictionary is often seen as a sophomoric source for dirty words, but now bored social media users have tapped into the participatory glossary for something new – to find alternate definitions for their names that aren’t in the list. Oxford English Dictionary. The bizarre name game is currently going viral as users flock to Twitter to share the results.

The online journey of self-discovery is simple: just type in your name and generate a plethora of hilarious nickname meanings. For example, “Ben” – a Hebrew word meaning “son of the right hand” – is defined by Urban Dictionary like “a cute, tall, dark, handsome boy” that you can “take to your mom”. Or, depending on the top-rated entry with 1,415 upvotes, a “duck overlord” who “can mind-control ducks of all kinds.”

By a similar sign, a Twitter user named Johanna was delighted to find that her name was synonymous with “one of the most angelic people you could meet,” among other flattering definitions.

Ben, as defined by the top entry in Urban Dictionary.

Meanwhile, one of the top-rated Urban Dictionary definitions for Brandi was “sickest, funniest chick you’ve ever met,” by another tweet.

“She loves rough and free drama,” the submission read. “She is very sensual and affectionate. Non-materialist and she chooses her friends as she picks her fruit. She’s hard to anger, but once she is angry, beware.

UD enthusiasts shared the results on Twitter.
UD enthusiasts shared the results on Twitter.

And the viral vocabulary collection doesn’t discriminate against more diverse names. According to another tweet, which a satisfied user captioned “The urban dictionary only says facts”, the Korean name Junho means “a sexy Korean with a big a-.”

Of course, many Twitter users weren’t too impressed with the etymological pursuit, which they found a bit self-congratulating by nature.

“No offense, but absolutely no one reads the names of your urban dictionaries” mocked a critic on Twitter.

Another prankster posted a screenshot for an urban dictionary entry for Elijah, who was defined as someone who “don’t give out what your names mean on Urban Dictionary.”

Urban Dictionary did not discriminate against foreign sounding names.
Urban Dictionary did not discriminate against foreign sounding names.

Of course, not all terms have such a complementary connotation on the street slang site. For example, just like on Twitter and elsewhere, the majority of UD entries define “Karen” as a white woman titled – “typically blonde” – complaining to authority figures on the slightest inconvenience that does not affect him “even remotely”.

Not all definitions were so flattering.
Not all definitions were so flattering.



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Words for good politicians are hard to find in the dictionary – Susie Dent https://phuutthai.com/words-for-good-politicians-are-hard-to-find-in-the-dictionary-susie-dent/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:17:25 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/words-for-good-politicians-are-hard-to-find-in-the-dictionary-susie-dent/ The House of Commons: When it was discovered that former Cabinet Minister Owen Paterson had violated lobbying rules and rules of conduct for MPs, the term “sleaze” was a linguistic slam-dunk à la both for the opposition and the media, writes Susie Dent. The sound of sleaze fits his definition perfectly – it’s smooth, rippling, […]]]>
The House of Commons: When it was discovered that former Cabinet Minister Owen Paterson had violated lobbying rules and rules of conduct for MPs, the term “sleaze” was a linguistic slam-dunk à la both for the opposition and the media, writes Susie Dent.

The sound of sleaze fits his definition perfectly – it’s smooth, rippling, and suggestively seedy. He’s also climbing the language charts, oozing politics again. With him comes an accompanying lexicon of obscenity which confirms that he never really disappeared.

“Sleaze” has turned out to be a remarkably elastic term. It lends itself just as well to illicit business or a vice of any kind as it does to financial scandals and expenditure scandals. It encompasses work and nepotism, cronyism and simple lies. When Owen Paterson was convicted of breaking the lobbying rules and the rules of conduct for MPs, the term was a linguistic slam-dunk to both the opposition and the media.

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Sleaze’s own story isn’t that simple: In its early days, the word was much more about fragility than dirt. It started as a spinoff from “sleazy”, which was first recorded in the 1640s in the writings of Sir Kenelm Digby, philosopher and courtier of Charles I. Digby uses “sleazy” to describe the distillation of certain spirits, which “are in themselves as hairy or silty, that is to say they have small downy parts, as we see on the feet of flies.”

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Tinder personality descriptions could be animated with words like bellibon, cl …

The paws of the insects may seem easily reminiscent of the limbs stretched out on the benches by some members of the House of Commons, but the emphasis here is on vagueness and, by extension, things without substance. It wasn’t until the 1940s that the implications of sordidity crept in.

The etymology of sleaze is also perfectly slippery. A popular suggestion is that it starts with “Sleazy Cloth,” in which “sleazy” was slang for Silesia, a region now in southwestern Poland that was once famous for the production of fine textiles. “Silesia” itself has become a generic term for high quality, and so “sordid” fabric was originally anything but sordid. Like some members of Parliament, its reputation was not to last, and it was knock-offs at a reduced price that ultimately did.

Sleazy eventually got hooked on cheap knockoffs of the real thing: sordid in every way.

A similar word in the Sleaze lexicon, whose frequency in linguistic graphics is increasingly rapid, is “tawdry”. It also formerly referred to the fabric, this time commemorating Ely’s patroness, Ethelreda, known as Saint Audrey. The stalls sold fine lace necklaces and ribbons known as “St Audrey’s lace” – “tacky lace” when pronounced quickly. As the quality of the fair’s adornments declined, the “tawdry” remained on the cheap and low-quality side of life.

In the 14th century, those who exhibited fraudulent behavior in public life would have been called “corrumpent”, from the Latin cor, “together”, and rumpere, “to break, violate or destroy”. They are the breakers of the laws that they themselves helped to put in place, rendering them unnecessary. Corrupting was to spread corruption or, as the Oxford English Dictionary says, “to putrid”; it was eventually replaced by “corrupt”, whose first meaning was also “to rot”, like spoiled fruit. A powerful word, it also applied to anyone so debased in character that they were believed to have been infected with evil.

The dictionary also gives us a specific term for corruption in the job, office or position of trust. It is the 16th century “embezzlement”, from the Latin maleversari, “to act badly”. There are many examples of its use throughout history, such as in a letter from the Duke of Wellington in 1811 complaining that “this malfeasance in office, this neglect of duty … has gone unnoticed”. Not so unnoticed fifty years later, when John Richard Green notes in A short history of the English people that “Charges of embezzlement and corruption have been leveled against members of the House”.

Green was writing at a time, much like ours, when business and personal interests were seen as a distortion of government policy and policy, leading to strong waves of anti-corruption sentiment and new calls for legislation. The Reform Act of 1832 was intended to clear up the electoral system, but even in its early days the London and Westminster Review lamented the fact that “already … the envious goddess of corruption has sent two deadliest serpents, corruption and intimidation, to strangle the baby-giant “. The serpent metaphor is also played invisibly in “extortion”, which comes from the Latin torquere, to twist or squeeze hard.

Corruption has been known by a variety of other names in the past, from boodlerism to palmistry and, of course, “blackmail,” which was originally a form of protection racketeering. 16th-century Scottish chiefs regularly demanded money from farmers and small landowners in the border counties of England and Scotland, in return for protection or immunity from plunder. “Mail” here comes from an old Scandinavian word mál, meaning “speech, agreement”, while “black” was a nasty riff on “white money”, the silver coins in which legitimate rents were paid. .

Lobbying, meanwhile, takes its name from the physical lobbies of the US and UK legislative assemblies where ministers meet to vote and where talks between members and non-members of the House take place. From this was born the involvement of paid advocacy and the search for favors by those with private or commercial interests.

It’s a collection of sordid words, perhaps matched only by the list of epithets for those in office who are themselves mired in sordid. Words like “snollygoster”: a politician for his own gain, or a “quockerwodger”: one whose strings are fully pulled by someone else. If only we had a comparable lexicon for those with integrity and honesty, who are unfairly involved in the midst of vulgarity. Words for good politicians are hard to find in the dictionary, suggesting that fairness has long been stifled by ambition.

But then “ambition” itself arose in politics, a nod to the Roman electoral hopes who would roam the city to display their credentials. Their gowns were always bright white, candidus in Latin, as an outward display of purity – we received the word “candidate” from them. It seems that the sordid web of politics has come undone from the start.

-Susie Dent is a lexicographer and etymologist. She has appeared in Dictionary Corner on Countdown since 1992. Her book, Word Perfect: Etymological Entertainment for Every Day of the Year, is now available.

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Jane Birdsall-Lander’s Dictionary Poetry Project is a journey through language https://phuutthai.com/jane-birdsall-landers-dictionary-poetry-project-is-a-journey-through-language/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 21:18:51 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/jane-birdsall-landers-dictionary-poetry-project-is-a-journey-through-language/ Background, virus, race, home truth, mask and triangle are the six words local artist Jane Birdsall-Lander used in her latest edition of the Poem Project Dictionary. In this project, Birdsall-Lander explores the relationship between language and objects or images by first selecting a word, then writing a poem and illustrating it with an image that […]]]>

Background, virus, race, home truth, mask and triangle are the six words local artist Jane Birdsall-Lander used in her latest edition of the Poem Project Dictionary.

In this project, Birdsall-Lander explores the relationship between language and objects or images by first selecting a word, then writing a poem and illustrating it with an image that “comes out of the language itself” . In previous editions, she has explored human relationships and connections using words such as birthday, new year, card, and storm.

Birdsall-Lander describes word selection as a partnership between itself and the word. “I always collect words. I start by looking at the etymology, and some words just don’t go anywhere, ”she says. “I don’t know if it’s me, or if some words are hiding and later I’ll come back and it will open. It probably has to do with me, but I associate with the word because that’s how I feel. “

Some words just don’t work, like the word change. “I just can’t find the catwalk to take her somewhere. I tried. It’s such a powerful word, and I always have it on my list, ”says Birdsall-Lander. Other words that she will hear in a conversation or read in a book, and she should stop and write them down immediately.

The latest edition of the project, which she calls ‘The Pandemic Edition’ because it was conceived in her forties, “takes the viewer / reader into a deep dive into the root of racism in America, social justice, individual loss and world, the false illusion born of wishful thinking, the case of reciprocal human empathy and the challenge of choice in the face of climate change. This climate threat continues, the murder of George Floyd by a white police officer and the coronavirus weighed heavily on Birdsall-Lander’s mind and prompted his word searches. She chose words that she hopes will help others to absorb their experiences of the past year and a half.

The reasoning behind the choice of certain words seems obvious, but for others it is not so obvious. Birdsall-Lander chose the wishbone, for example, because there is so much wishful thinking in the world right now, but the differences between those wishes can actually cause even more division. “Everyone wants the best in their own way,” she says. “It separates us, but we are all connected. ”

The six prints containing the poems will be part of the Missouri History Museum’s fine art collection, where they will be featured in an exhibit of works made during the pandemic. The pieces are currently in the examination phase and will then pass to the museum’s acquisition committee.

November 15, 2021

3:02 p.m.


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Sharjah ruler launches first 17 volumes of ‘Historical Dictionary of the Arabic language’ – News https://phuutthai.com/sharjah-ruler-launches-first-17-volumes-of-historical-dictionary-of-the-arabic-language-news/ https://phuutthai.com/sharjah-ruler-launches-first-17-volumes-of-historical-dictionary-of-the-arabic-language-news/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 04:28:01 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/sharjah-ruler-launches-first-17-volumes-of-historical-dictionary-of-the-arabic-language-news/ The dictionary will be available on a dedicated website and app. Posted: Wed, Nov 3, 2021, 8:28 AM Last update: Wed, Nov 3, 2021, 4:56 PM His Highness Dr Sheikh Sultan bin Muhammad Al Qasimi, Member of the Supreme Council, Ruler of Sharjah and President of the Academy of Arabic Language in Sharjah, today launched […]]]>

The dictionary will be available on a dedicated website and app.



Posted: Wed, Nov 3, 2021, 8:28 AM

Last update: Wed, Nov 3, 2021, 4:56 PM

His Highness Dr Sheikh Sultan bin Muhammad Al Qasimi, Member of the Supreme Council, Ruler of Sharjah and President of the Academy of Arabic Language in Sharjah, today launched the first 17 volumes of the ‘Historical Dictionary of the Arabic Language’ ‘, during the opening of the 40th edition of the Sharjah International Book Fair (SIBF), organized by the Sharjah Book Authority (SBA) at the Expo Center Sharjah.

Sheikh Sultan bin Ahmed Al Qasimi, deputy governor of Sharjah, was also present at the launching ceremony of the dictionary, the largest Arabic linguistic knowledge and information project that documents the history of lexicons of the Arabic language and their transformations from ‘usage over the past 17 centuries (Pre-Islamic to the present day).

The dictionary not only provides the history, origins, meanings and explanations of the words, but also documents the history of the nation, preserves its civilization, and celebrates the achievements of the Arabs. It describes words, the definition of the semantics of words according to their historical contexts and their etymology.

Sheikh Sultan also announced that the dictionary will be available on a dedicated website and app.

The Historical Dictionary of the Arabic Language introduces the new generation to the history of their grandparents, regions and historical events in which they can prepare for larger and more in-depth historical and linguistic studies. The dictionary connects the new generation to the history of the nation through the precious language, which preserves the tradition, values ​​and history of the nation.

In a keynote address, the ruler of Sharjah noted: “Arabic is one of the oldest living languages. We are here to celebrate the Arabic language experts who have come together to work for years to document the roots and meanings of the Arabic language alphabet. We started to work hard and fill in the gaps that existed in the documentation of the language. Finally, the sun has risen on this magnificent Corpus, the fruit of the efforts of several Arabic language institutions across the region.

“The role this detailed corpus will play in informing and educating students, researchers, linguists and even everyday language enthusiasts will be immense. I am not exaggerating when I say that there has not been another project that has caught my attention or the attention of the Arab linguistic community in our region as far as this project has. I am monitoring the progress of the efforts of everyone involved in this project, and I assure you that in the years to come we will be publishing several more volumes. I thank everyone involved in the success of this project, ”added His Highness.

Sheikh Sultan also signed the first edition of the Historical Corpus of the Arabic Language during the opening ceremony of SIBF 2021.

The first volumes of the corpus are devoted to the first five Arabic letters: the hamza (ء), ba (ب), ta (ت) tha (ث) and jeem (ج) and describe their evolution throughout the pre-Islamic period, l Islamic Era from AH 1 to AH 132, the Abbasid Caliphate from AH 133 to AH 656 and the Modern Era from AH 1214 to date.

Historical Corpus of the Arabic Language website

The website will offer academics, linguists, researchers and language enthusiasts access to the 17 volumes of the corpus from anywhere in the world. The website also has a section that hosts a bibliography of the books that were consulted to write the first volumes of the Historical Corpus, and lists the names of editors, linguists, and experts from the 10 Arabic-language academies across the Arab world. who collaborated on the project.

The digital platform that was created to access the Historical Corpus of the Arabic Language online is easy to use and can quickly filter search results in historical contexts. In addition, it has optical recognition software (OCR) that converts written texts into spoken words.

The champions of the Arabic language bring the historic project to fruition

The corpus saw the collaboration of hundreds of researchers and senior linguists, editors and experts from 10 Arabic language academies across the Arab world, under the supervision of the Union of Arabic Scientific Language Academies in Cairo, in Egypt, and together with the Arabic Language Academy in Sharjah manages the executive committee of the project. The corpus is based on a database of sources collected and digitized over the past four years, including 20,000 books, manuscripts, sources and historical Arabic documents, including ancient inscriptions and archaeological finds, dating back to the 3rd century BC. Islam.

It traces the history of a given word and identifies the first user and the evolution of that word from pre-Islamic Arabia to modern times. In this regard, it is different from any other dictionary as it cites vibrant quotes from the Holy Quran and Hadiths as well as poems, speeches, letters and other sources.

It also reveals the evolution of Arabic idioms and expressions through the centuries, and documents the entry of new words into the Arabic language, lists words that are no longer in use, and explains the reasons. In addition, the corpus reviews the development of the arts and sciences directly related to linguistics, including grammar, morphology, philology, phonetics, rhetoric, rhyme, etc.

The corpus also offers comparative lexical reviews on Arabic and the influence it had on other Semitic languages ​​such as Hebrew, Akkadian, Syriac, Abyssinian and Amharic. An expert committee highlighted the similarities and differences between Arabic words and equivalent words in these languages, citing examples and documenting the bibliography and reference books that were used in the project.


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The ruler of Sharjah launches the first 17 volumes of the historical dictionary of the Arabic language https://phuutthai.com/the-ruler-of-sharjah-launches-the-first-17-volumes-of-the-historical-dictionary-of-the-arabic-language/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 21:00:10 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/the-ruler-of-sharjah-launches-the-first-17-volumes-of-the-historical-dictionary-of-the-arabic-language/ SHARJAH, (UrduPoint / Pakistan Point News / WAM – November 3, 2021) His Royal Highness Dr Sheikh Sultan bin Muhammad Al Qasimi, Member of the Supreme and Ruler of Sharjah Council, today launched the first 17 volumes of the ” Historical Dictionary of the Arabic Language ”, at the opening of the 40th edition of […]]]>

SHARJAH, (UrduPoint / Pakistan Point News / WAM – November 3, 2021) His Royal Highness Dr Sheikh Sultan bin Muhammad Al Qasimi, Member of the Supreme and Ruler of Sharjah Council, today launched the first 17 volumes of the ” Historical Dictionary of the Arabic Language ”, at the opening of the 40th edition of the Sharjah International Book Fair (SIBF), organized by the Sharjah Book Authority (SBA), at the Expo Center Sharjah.

His Highness Sheikh Sultan bin Ahmed Al Qasimi, Deputy Sovereign of Sharjah, attended the launching ceremony of the Dictionary, the largest Arabic linguistic knowledge and information project that documents the history of Arabic language lexicons and their transformations of use during the last 17 centuries (pre-Islamic at the present time).

The dictionary not only provides the history, origins, meanings and explanations of the words, but also documents the history of the nation, preserves its civilization, and celebrates the achievements of Arabs from the Arabian Peninsula to the Atlantic Ocean.

It describes words, the definition of the semantics of words according to their historical contexts and their etymology.

Sheikh Sultan also announced that the dictionary will be available on a dedicated website and app.

The Historical Dictionary of the Arabic Language introduces the new generation to the history of their grandparents, regions and historical events in which they can prepare for larger and more in-depth historical and linguistic studies. The dictionary connects the new generation to the history of the nation through the precious language, which preserves the tradition, values ​​and history of the nation.


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Merriam-Webster Adds “Goetta” To Her Dictionary, Making Hungry Cincinnatians Very Happy, In Cincinnati News https://phuutthai.com/merriam-webster-adds-goetta-to-her-dictionary-making-hungry-cincinnatians-very-happy-in-cincinnati-news/ https://phuutthai.com/merriam-webster-adds-goetta-to-her-dictionary-making-hungry-cincinnatians-very-happy-in-cincinnati-news/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 17:26:43 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/merriam-webster-adds-goetta-to-her-dictionary-making-hungry-cincinnatians-very-happy-in-cincinnati-news/ Goetta is officially in the dictionary. May he reign for a long time.Photo: Hailey Bollinger Here has CityBeat, we mince words and then we spit them out on you to read them. Based on some Merriam websterthe latest dictionary entries, it looks like we’re in good company. As one of the largest dictionaries in the […]]]>

Goetta is officially in the dictionary. May he reign for a long time.Photo: Hailey Bollinger

Here has CityBeat, we mince words and then we spit them out on you to read them. Based on some Merriam websterthe latest dictionary entries, it looks like we’re in good company.

As one of the largest dictionaries in the world, the Merriam-Webster Dictionary Periodically adds words to its extensive archive, updating them as definitions change or something becomes fashionable. In its recently announced October updates, Merriam webster added a term Cincinnati is familiar with: “Goetta”.

The German dish appears on menus all around Greater Cincinnati, is a staple at Oktoberfest events and even has its own festival, so locals can rejoice that the English-American language keeper has finally deemed Goetta – with a capital G – worthy of archiving.

here’s how Merriam webster defines Goetta:

Goetta: meat (like pork) mixed with oats, onions and spices and fried in the form of a pancake.

And here is the history and etymology of the term:

borrowed from a West Low German word, such as Westphalian (West Münsterland) Götte, Gotte “grits, husked grain with part of the bran removed, hulled oats”, dating back to Middle Low German görte, metatheistic form of grütte “grits” , going back to Germanic * grutjō-

In a blog post, Merriam webster says he added 455 words and phrases in October. Many reflect the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, such as ‘long COVID’ and ‘super-spreader’, while others show our obsession with online culture and politics, such as ‘whataboutism’ and ‘FTW’ (for victory). Hell, MW even added “daddy bod”.

Goetta isn’t the only new food term in the dictionary; Merriam webster also added “fluffernutter”, “horchata”, “chicharron”, “air fryer” and “ghost kitchen”.

See everything Merriam websterthe new words of October.

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New words added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary https://phuutthai.com/new-words-added-to-the-merriam-webster-dictionary/ https://phuutthai.com/new-words-added-to-the-merriam-webster-dictionary/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/new-words-added-to-the-merriam-webster-dictionary/ The lexicographers working for Merriam-Webster are not word snobs. They understand better than anyone that the language is constantly changing, and even the silliest slang deserves a place in the dictionary if used enough. After closely following the evolution of the lexicon, Merriam webster added 455 terms to the dictionary in October 2021. A lot […]]]>

The lexicographers working for Merriam-Webster are not word snobs. They understand better than anyone that the language is constantly changing, and even the silliest slang deserves a place in the dictionary if used enough. After closely following the evolution of the lexicon, Merriam webster added 455 terms to the dictionary in October 2021.

A lot of newly recognized words reflect our present times. Coronavirus related terms such as super-spreader, breakthrough, and vaccination passport have become common enough to warrant their own entries. Some words are not directly related to COVID but are indicative of the impact of the pandemic on culture. For example, the Merriam-Webster dictionary now includes digital nomadbecause many people have switched to remote work.

As is the case every year, many additions come from the Internet. Merriam-Webster users can now search for definitions of TBH, FTW, and copy-pasta by the resource. The new list also includes many terms that have been around for some time, such as chicharron and misty. You can see 20 notable entries from the new word bundle below.

1. Air fryer (N.)

“An airtight electrical appliance, generally small in size, for the rapid cooking of food by means of convection currents circulating rapidly by a fan. “

2.amirite (interj.)

“Am I right?” According to Merriam-Webster, the slang term is used to “represent or imitate the use of this sentence as a tag question in informal speech”.

3. Synthetic turf (adj.)

A less common use of the brand name for artificial turf. Astroturf describes an organization or initiative “falsely made to appear at the grassroots”.

4. Breakthrough (N.)

When used in a medical sense, it means “an infection occurring in a person fully vaccinated against an infectious agent”.

5. Chicharron (N.)

“A small piece of pork belly or pork skin that is fried and usually eaten as a snack.”

6. Copypasta (N.)

“Data (such as a block of text) that has been copied and disseminated widely online.” Copypasta is often a source of misinformation or urban legends on the Internet.

7. Daddy’s body (N.)

Defined as “a physique considered typical of an average father,” this common internet slang dates back to 2003.

8. Digital nomad (N.)

“Someone who does their job entirely on the Internet while traveling.”

9. Doorbell camera (N.)

“A small camera designed for use on an exterior door, which includes or connects to a doorbell, and which often has a built-in microphone and speaker.”

10. Falcon (N.)

A hairstyle that is slicked up to look like a Mohawk.

11. Fluffernutter (N.)

The word for a peanut butter and marshmallow sandwich, misty dates back to 1961.

12. Fourth trimester (N.)

The three-month recovery period immediately after childbirth.

13. FTW (ABBRV.)

Abbreviation of “for the victory”.

14. Halotherapy (N.)

“The therapeutic use of salt generally by inhalation of an aerosol composed mainly of fine particles of salt and diffused in an enclosed space. “

15. Horchata (N.)

“A cold sweet drink made with ground rice or almonds and usually flavorings such as cinnamon or vanilla.”

16. Super-spreader (N.)

“A highly contagious individual capable of transmitting a communicable disease to an unusually large number of uninfected individuals.”

17. Oobleck (N.)

“A mixture of corn starch and water that behaves like a liquid at rest and like a solid when pressure is applied.”

18. Otaku (N.)

This word generally described someone with an intense interest in anime and manga.

19. TBH (abbreviation)

Short for “to be honest”.

20. Vaccination passport (N.)

“A physical or digital document providing proof of vaccination against one or more infectious diseases (such as COVID-19).”


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25 new non-color words have just been added to the Oxford English dictionary https://phuutthai.com/25-new-non-color-words-have-just-been-added-to-the-oxford-english-dictionary/ https://phuutthai.com/25-new-non-color-words-have-just-been-added-to-the-oxford-english-dictionary/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/25-new-non-color-words-have-just-been-added-to-the-oxford-english-dictionary/ The Oxford English Dictionary is an institution almost 135 years old, but it is no better than recognizing distorted terminology once it enters the popular lexicon. Buttmunch, assfuck, and douchebaggery are just a few fun examples of the more than 1,400 new words added to the dictionary this quarter. According to Quartz, keeping the dictionary […]]]>

The Oxford English Dictionary is an institution almost 135 years old, but it is no better than recognizing distorted terminology once it enters the popular lexicon. Buttmunch, assfuck, and douchebaggery are just a few fun examples of the more than 1,400 new words added to the dictionary this quarter.

According to Quartz, keeping the dictionary up to date is a never-ending process at DEO. In addition to examining language trends for general new words to add, publishers evaluate a portion of the book each quarter to determine if any new additions or variations need to be included. This time around they gave us a bunch of delicious new entrees including d-bag, idiocracy, ass-end, well, stopper.

Editors also review words that fall under a different theme each quarter. After examining the terms related to cinema and cinema that have gained traction over the years, the editors decided to make Kubrickian, Indiana Jones, Mrs. Robinson, Oscar bait, and no more official dictionary.

You can check out some of the highlights of the new entries below and read the full list. here.

1. assfuck
2. buttocks
3. ass-end
4. ass kicker
5. without ass
6. Bobbitt
7. hogwash
8. blah
9. bogey
ten. boogie
11. butt crunch
12. bump and grind
13. dead end
14. buttery face
15. end to end
16. asshole
17. booty
18. assfuck
19. d-bag
20. douchebaggery
21. dumbass
22. idiocracy
23. jabroni
24. lumberjack
25. sloppy seconds

[h/t Quartz]


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25 of the new words Merriam-Webster is adding to the dictionary in 2018 https://phuutthai.com/25-of-the-new-words-merriam-webster-is-adding-to-the-dictionary-in-2018/ https://phuutthai.com/25-of-the-new-words-merriam-webster-is-adding-to-the-dictionary-in-2018/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/25-of-the-new-words-merriam-webster-is-adding-to-the-dictionary-in-2018/ If you don’t spend most of your time on the internet, it can be difficult to keep up with the changing jargon of the digital age. Fortunately, the editors of Merriam webster have done the hard work of keeping track of the most important new terms to know: The American institution has added more than […]]]>

If you don’t spend most of your time on the internet, it can be difficult to keep up with the changing jargon of the digital age. Fortunately, the editors of Merriam webster have done the hard work of keeping track of the most important new terms to know: The American institution has added more than 840 new words to its dictionary, many of which did not exist a few decades ago.

Readers who are fluent in the Internet will be familiar with many of the list entries, and there are also many new words specific to the tech world. Not all words new to the dictionary are necessarily new to the language; Merriam-Webster now includes culinary terms that have been around for some time, and the new list also features common word abbreviations. Check out a sample of the new entries below.

1. CANDLE (ADJ.)

Short for bourgeois, this term means “marked by a concern for wealth, possessions and respectability”.

2. TL; DR (ABBREV.)

” Too long ; I haven’t read – I used to say that something would take too long to read. “

3. BINGEABLE (ADJ.)

“Have multiple episodes or parts that can be watched in quick succession.”

4. PREDICTIVE (ADJ.)

A sin predictive text: “Of, relating to, or usable or valuable for prediction.”

5. HAPTIC (NOT.)

“The use of electronically or mechanically generated movement that a user experiences through the sense of touch as part of an interface (such as on a game console or smartphone).”

6. FORCE TO EXIT (V.)

“To force (an unresponsive computer program) to stop (such as using a series of preset keystrokes).”

7. AIRPLANE MODE (NOT.)

“A mode of operation for an electronic device (such as a mobile phone) in which the device does not connect to wireless networks and cannot send or receive communications (such as calls or SMS) or access to the Internet but can still be used for other functions. “

8. INSTAGRAM (V.)

“To post (a photo) on the Instagram photo sharing service.”

9. BIOHACKING (NOT.)

“Biological experimentation (such as through gene editing or the use of drugs or implants) performed to improve the qualities or capabilities of living organisms, especially by individuals and groups outside of a research environment traditional medical or scientific. “

ten. FINTECH (NOT.)

“Products and companies that use newly developed digital and online technologies in the banking and financial services industries. “

11. MARG (NOT.)

A margarita. According to Merriam-Webster, the first known use was in 1990.

12. FAVORITES (NOT.)

Favorite. This word is older than it seems: it dates from 1938. (“Lester Harding, the big favorite here, clicks with pop songs”, was the first usage, according to in the Oxford English Dictionary.)

13. LOVES (ADJ.)

“Extremely charming or attractive: adorable.”

14. HIKING (NOT.)

According to Merriam-Webster, this “often derogatory” slang means “A random person: someone who is not known or recognizable or whose appearance (such as in a conversation or story) seems spontaneous or unwanted.”

15. GUAC (NOT.)

Guacamole.

16. IFTAR (NOT.)

“A meal eaten by Muslims at sunset to break the daily fast during Ramadan.”

17. GOCHUJANG (NOT.)

Spicy paste used in Korean cuisine made with red peppers, sticky rice and fermented soybeans.

18. ESTABLISHMENT (NOT.)

“A culinary process in which ingredients are prepared and organized (like in a restaurant kitchen) before cooking.”

19. HOP (NOT.)

Originally a slang word for an addict dating back to 1883, this word today means “A beer lover”.

20. ZOODLE (NOT.)

“A long, thin strip of zucchini that looks like a string or a narrow ribbon of pasta.”

21. HANGRY (ADJ.)

“Irritable or angry with hunger.” People have been hungry (or at least use the word) since 1956.

22. MOCKTAIL (NOT.)

“A generally ice-cold drink made from a variety of ingredients (such as juice, herbs and sparkling water) but without alcohol: a non-alcoholic cocktail.”

23. LATINX (ADJ.)

“From, related to or marked by Latin American heritage – used as a non-sexist alternative to Latino or Latina.”

24. GENERATION Z (NOT.)

The generation of people born in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

25. CITY TENT (NOT.)

“A set of many tents set up in an area to provide generally temporary shelter (such as for the displaced or homeless).”


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