Stay, bodily shame and essential worker all enter the Oxford dictionary in 2021 – but what does catastrophism mean?

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More … than 500 new words were added to the Oxford English Dictionary in 2020. In June 2021 that number increased by 40%, with more than 700 words added in the first six months of 2021.

The origins of many words, such as staycation and essential worker, may be linked to the pandemic. However, some words, such as amazeballs and adulting, have been added to the 2021 dictionary due to cultural usage.

The team at Prepayment have found 15 of the strangest and most wonderful words you can now find in the dictionary.

Word / Phrase

Sense

Stay

Going on vacation at home or in your country of residence

Cancel culture

The practice or tendency to engage in mass cancellation as a means of expressing disapproval and exerting social pressure

Essential worker

A worker who is of crucial importance in a particular field or business

Main character syndrome

The feeling that your life is a movie or a play and that you are the main character in it

Gender pay gap

A difference in pay between men and women

Doomscrolling

Read the news on social media and expect it to be bad

Adult

The act of becoming or acting like an adult

sapiosexual

Related to, or characterized by a sexual or romantic attraction to very intelligent people

Co-working

Work in a building where several tenants rent a workspace and have access to common facilities

Express enthusiastic approval: great, excellent, very impressive; fantastic

Body-shame

Mocking, humiliating or stigmatizing (a person) on the basis of alleged flaws or imperfections in the shape, size or appearance of the body.

Chop

Call (a person) an abusive name; verbally insult; shout with anger.

Volunteering

Vacation spent volunteering

Astraphobia

A fear of lightning

Dinger

Buttocks of a person

Source: Prepayment

The team at Prepayment also revealed languages ​​with the most swear words, using global dictionaries and interviewing bilingual speakers.

With 348 swear words recorded, English took first place, beating Spanish with 251 and German with 196.

Tongue

Number of swear words recorded

English

348

Spanish

251

German

196

French

151

Japanese

150

Bulgarian

129

Russian

123

Swedish

120

Croatian

112

Polish

112

Portuguese

110

Italian

108

Norwegian

94

Filipino

48

Czechia

42

Source: Prepayment

Daniele Saccardi the online language learning platform, Prepayment, said, “Language shapes our ability to communicate thoughts and feelings and swear words are a vital part of language that expresses everything from anger to frustration to happiness.

“While swearing can be rude used in the wrong context, it can also increase the effectiveness and persuasiveness of a message. “


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