english dictionary – Phuut Thai http://phuutthai.com/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 17:39:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://phuutthai.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-5-120x120.png english dictionary – Phuut Thai http://phuutthai.com/ 32 32 Bilingual Hausa-English dictionary launched in Kano https://phuutthai.com/bilingual-hausa-english-dictionary-launched-in-kano/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 12:08:56 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/bilingual-hausa-english-dictionary-launched-in-kano/ A Hausa-English dictionary was launched on Saturday at Bayero University in Kano (BUK). The 627-page book, written by Indiana-based American linguistics scholar Paul Newman and his wife, Roxana, was published by BUK press. Newman was in 1972 the pioneer director of the Center for the Study of Nigerian Languages ​​at the former Abdullahi Bayero College, […]]]>

A Hausa-English dictionary was launched on Saturday at Bayero University in Kano (BUK).

The 627-page book, written by Indiana-based American linguistics scholar Paul Newman and his wife, Roxana, was published by BUK press.

Newman was in 1972 the pioneer director of the Center for the Study of Nigerian Languages ​​at the former Abdullahi Bayero College, which morphed into the BUK.

According to book reviewer and executive director of the Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC), Professor Isma’il Junaidu, the publication is the most comprehensive bilingual Hausa dictionary since the 1930s.

Junaidu said the dictionary was written in standardized Hausa, while its authors were one of the leading authorities on Afro-Chadic languages ​​globally.

Speaking at the launch, Newman, who was represented by the Dean of the BUK School of Postgraduate Studies, Professor Mustapha Ahmad Isa, said the book launch was a milestone in Hausa language research, and that it also coincided with his 50th birthday. to come to Nigeria.

“With its large number of native speakers and users around the world, Hausa is today without a doubt the most important language in Africa and one of the most important in the world,” Newman said.

Earlier, BUK Vice-Chancellor Prof. Sagir Adamu Abbas said the launch of the dictionary was not accidental but implied the university’s attraction for knowledge development and research.

The event was honored by the Emirs of Kano, Kazaure, Karaye and Polish Ambassador to Nigeria, Joanna Tarnawska; representatives of the governors of Kano, Bauchi, Jigawa and Katsina, as well as a renowned business tycoon, Alhaji Aminu Dantata.

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Dictionary.com names alliance as word of the year for 2021 | Books https://phuutthai.com/dictionary-com-names-alliance-as-word-of-the-year-for-2021-books/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/dictionary-com-names-alliance-as-word-of-the-year-for-2021-books/ Allyship is the Dictionary.com Word of the Year from the old name to the new. The site with 70 million monthly users took the unusual step of anointing a word it added last month, although the “alliance” first surfaced in the mid-1800s, said John Kelly, Associate Director of Content and Education. “It might be a […]]]>


Allyship is the Dictionary.com Word of the Year from the old name to the new.

The site with 70 million monthly users took the unusual step of anointing a word it added last month, although the “alliance” first surfaced in the mid-1800s, said John Kelly, Associate Director of Content and Education.

“It might be a surprising choice for some,” he said. “In recent decades, the term has evolved to take on a more nuanced and specific meaning. It continues to evolve and we have seen it in several ways.

The site offers two definitions of the alliance: the role of a person who advocates for the inclusion of a “marginalized or politicized group” out of solidarity but not as a member, and the more traditional relationship of “people, groups”. or nations associating and cooperating with one another for a common cause or goal ”.

The word is separated from “alliance,” which Dictionary.com defines in a sense as “a merger of efforts or interests by individuals, families, states, or organizations.”

The first definition of alliance took off in the mid-2000s. After the summer of 2020 and the death of George Floyd, white allies – and the word alliance – proliferated as protests of racial justice spread. Before that, heterosexual allies joined in the causes of LGBTQ oppression, discrimination and marginalization.

“This year, we have seen many high-profile companies and organizations, publicly, undertake efforts to promote diversity, equity and inclusion. Allyship is related to this. In the classroom, there is a flashpoint around the term “critical race theory”. Allyship is tied to that as well, ”Kelly said.

Teachers, frontline workers and mothers juggling jobs, housework and childcare during the lockdown won allies when the pandemic took hold last year.

Without an entry for “ally,” Kelly said the site saw a sharp increase in searches for “ally” in 2020 and strong increases in 2021. It was in the top 850 for searches of thousands and thousands of words this year. year. Dictionary.com has expanded the definition of “ally” to include the more nuanced meaning.

The terms “DEI” and “critical breed theory” debuted as entries on the site with “ally” this year.

One aspect of the alliance is how bad it can go. Among the examples of use of the word cited by Merriam-Webster is that of Indigenous activist Hallie Sebastian: “A poor ally speaks to the marginalized by taking credit and receiving recognition for the arguments that the unprivileged.” have advanced all their lives. “

On the other side of the alliance, Kelly said, “is a sense of division, of polarization. It was January 6 ”and the attack on the US Capitol by supporters of Donald Trump. Allyship, he said, has become a powerful prism in terms of dichotomy in a chaotic cultural era over the past two years.

Other dictionary companies in the Word Game of the Year have focused on the pandemic and its fallout. The Oxford English Dictionary chose “vax” and Merriam-Webster chose “vaccine”. Collins Dictionary chose “NFT,” digital tokens that sell for millions.


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Dictionary.com names the word of the year for 2021: “Allyship” https://phuutthai.com/dictionary-com-names-the-word-of-the-year-for-2021-allyship/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/dictionary-com-names-the-word-of-the-year-for-2021-allyship/ NEW YORK (AP) – Allyship, a revamped old name, is Dictionary.com’s Word of the Year. The research site with 70 million monthly users took the unusual step of anointing a word it added last month, although the “alliance” first surfaced in the mid-1800s, said associate director of content and education John Kelly. “It might be […]]]>

NEW YORK (AP) – Allyship, a revamped old name, is Dictionary.com’s Word of the Year.

The research site with 70 million monthly users took the unusual step of anointing a word it added last month, although the “alliance” first surfaced in the mid-1800s, said associate director of content and education John Kelly.

“It might be a surprising choice for some,” he told The Associated Press ahead of Tuesday’s unveiling. “In recent decades, the term has evolved to take on a more nuanced and specific meaning. It continues to evolve and we have seen it in several ways.

The site offers two definitions of the alliance: the role of a person who advocates for the inclusion of a “marginalized or politicized group” out of solidarity but not as a member, and the more traditional relationship of “people, groups”. or nations associating and cooperating with one another for a common cause or purpose.

The word is separate from “alliance,” which Dictionary.com defines in a sense as “a merger of efforts or interests by individuals, families, states, or organizations.”

It is the first definition that took off most recently in the mid-2000s and has continued to evolve. After the summer of 2020 and the death of George Floyd, white allies – and the word alliance – proliferated as racial justice protests spread. Before that, heterosexual allies joined in the causes of LGBTQ oppression, discrimination and marginalization.

“This year, we have seen many high-profile companies and organizations, publicly, undertake efforts to promote diversity, equity and inclusion. Allyship is related to this. In the classroom, there is a flashpoint around the term Critical Race Theory. Allyship is tied to that as well, ”Kelly said.

Additionally, teachers, frontline workers and mothers juggling jobs, housework and childcare during lockdown gained allies when the pandemic took hold last year.

Without an entry for “ally,” Kelly said the site saw a sharp increase in searches for “ally” in 2020 and significant spikes in 2021. It was in the top 850 searches over thousands and thousands of words this year. . Dictionary.com has expanded the definition of “ally” to include the more nuanced meaning. The terms “DEI” and “critical breed theory” debuted as entries on the site with “ally” this year.

What it means to be a genuine ally has taken on new meaning as the buzz around the word has increased. One of the aspects of the alliance, as it appeared, is how bad it can go.

Among the examples of using the word in a sentence cited by Merriam-Webster is one written by Indigenous activist Hallie Sebastian: All Their Life. “

As Sheree Atcheson, Director of Global Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Forbes wrote, the alliance is an “ongoing process of building relationships based on trust, consistency and accountability with marginalized individuals and / or groups of people ”. It is not, she said, “self-defined – the work and effort must be recognized by those with whom you seek to ally”.

Allyship should be an “opportunity to grow and learn about ourselves, while building confidence in others,” Atcheson added.

Among the earliest evidence of the word “ally” in its original sense of “alliance” is the two-volume work of 1849, “The Lord of the Manor, or, the Lights and Shades of Country Life” by British novelist Thomas Hall: “In view of these considerations, it is possible that he heard of Miss Clough’s alliance with Lady Bourgoin.

Kelly delved into the history of the alliance in the sense of social justice. While the Oxford English Dictionary traces this use of the word back to the 1970s, Kelly found a text, “The Allies of the Negro” by Albert W. Hamilton, published in 1943. It deals in detail with potential allies of blacks. in the fight for racial equality:

“What some white liberals are starting to realize is that they had better look for black as an ally,” he wrote. “The new way of life sought by the liberal will be a sham without the racial equality that the negro seeks.” And the inclusion of the Negro in the daily work, in the organization, the direction and the rallying of the supports necessary to win a better world, can only be done on the basis of equality.

On the other side of the alliance, Kelly said, “is a sense of division, of polarization. It was January 6. Allyship, he said, has become a powerful prism in terms of dichotomy in a chaotic cultural era over the past two years.

Other dictionary companies in the Word Game of the Year have focused on the pandemic and its fallout for their picks. Oxford Languages, which oversees the Oxford English Dictionary, chose “vax” and Merriam-Webster chose “vaccine.” The Collins Dictionary, based in Glasgow, Scotland, has “NFT”, digital tokens that sell for millions.

While Merriam-Webster relies solely on site search data to choose a word of the year, Dictionary.com takes a broader approach. He scours search engines, a wide range of texts and draws on cultural influences to choose his word of the year.

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NFT beats Cheugy to be Collins Dictionary Word of the Year | Books https://phuutthai.com/nft-beats-cheugy-to-be-collins-dictionary-word-of-the-year-books/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/nft-beats-cheugy-to-be-collins-dictionary-word-of-the-year-books/ In a year in which musician Grimes sold a collection of digital artwork for almost $ 6million (£ 4.4million) and the original photo behind the Disaster Girl meme of 2005 for $ 473,000 (£ 354,000), Collins Dictionary made NFT its Word of the Year. The abbreviation for non-fungible token has seen a “meteoric” increase in […]]]>


In a year in which musician Grimes sold a collection of digital artwork for almost $ 6million (£ 4.4million) and the original photo behind the Disaster Girl meme of 2005 for $ 473,000 (£ 354,000), Collins Dictionary made NFT its Word of the Year.

The abbreviation for non-fungible token has seen a “meteoric” increase in use over the past year, Collins said, up 11,000% last year. Any digital creation can become an NFT, the term for a certificate of ownership, registered on a blockchain, or a digital register of transactions. The most valuable NFT to date is a collage by digital artist Beeple, which sold for £ 50.3million at Christie’s in March.

Collins defines NFT as “a unique digital certificate, stored in a blockchain, which is used to register ownership of an asset such as a work of art or a collector’s item”; its lexicographers, who monitor the Collins Corpus of 4.5 billion words to choose their word of the year, said they opted for the NFT because it demonstrates a “unique technicolor collision of art, technology and trade “which” shattered the noise of Covid “to become ubiquitous.

How Grimes announced his NFT art sale on Twitter last February. Photography: @ Grimezsz / Twitter

“It’s unusual for an abbreviation to see such a dramatic increase in usage, but the data we have from Collins Corpus reflects the remarkable ascendancy of NFT in 2021,” said Alex Beecroft, managing director of Collins Learning. “NFTs seem to be everywhere, from art sections and financial pages, to galleries and auction houses and on social media platforms. Whether the NFT will have a lasting influence remains to be seen, but its sudden presence in conversations around the world makes it very clearly our Word of the Year.

Last month, the Oxford English Dictionary named vax as its word of the year, noting that in September, use of the word had increased more than 72 times from the previous year.

NFT beat two other tech words on Collins’ 10 Words of the Year shortlist: crypto, the short form of cryptocurrency, whose use is up 468% year-over-year, according to Collins, and Metaverse, a term coined by Neal Stephenson in his 1992 novel Snow Crash. Describing a three-dimensional virtual world – like the one predicted by Meta, Mark Zuckerberg’s renowned Facebook company – metaverse usage has grown 12-fold since 2020.

Other vying words and phrases included Covid-focused pingdemia, hybrid work and double vaxxed, while climate anxiety was also on the list, reflecting growing concerns about climate change.

Collins also noted an increase in neopronom use, thanks to ongoing conversations about gender and portrayal of trans and non-binary people; he defines the word as “a recently invented pronoun, in particular a pronoun designed to avoid gender distinctions”.

Collins chose ‘containment’ as the word of the year in 2020 and ‘climate strike’ in 2019.

Collins’ 10 best words of 2021

TVN (ˌƐnɛfˈtiː) abbreviation of
1 Non-fungible token: a unique digital certificate, saved in a blockchain, which is used to register ownership of an asset such as a work of art or a collector’s item.
name
2 an asset whose ownership is registered by means of a non-fungible token: the artist sold the work as NFT

cheugy (ˈTʃuːɡɪ) adjective, slang
no longer considered cool or fashionable

climate anxiety (ˈKlaɪmət æŋˈzaɪɪtɪ) name
a state of distress caused by concerns about climate change

Climate anxiety… worry is global.
Climate anxiety… worry is global. Photograph: David Parry / PA

cryptography (ˈKrɪptəʊ) name, informal
short for cryptocurrency: a decentralized digital medium of exchange that is created, regulated, and traded using cryptography and (usually) open source software, and typically used for online shopping

double vaxxed (ˌDʌbəlˈvækst) adjective, informal
have received two vaccines against a disease. Also: double stitching

hybrid operation (ˌHaɪbrɪd ˈwɜːkɪŋ) name
the practice of alternating between different work environments, such as at home and in the office

metaverse (ˈMɛtəˌvɜːs) name
a proposed version of the Internet that integrates three-dimensional virtual environments

neopronom (ˌNiːəʊˈprəʊˌnaʊn) name
a recently coined pronoun, especially a pronoun designed to avoid gender distinctions

Pingdemic… companies have been seriously disrupted by the need for workers to isolate themselves.
Pingdemic… companies have been seriously disrupted by the need for workers to isolate themselves. Photography: Yui Mok / PA

pingemia (ˌPɪŋˈdɛmɪk) name, informal
large-scale notification of members of the public through a contact tracing application

Regencycore (ˈRiːdʒənsɪˌkɔː) name
a dress style inspired by clothes worn in high society during the Regency period (1811-1820). Also called: Regency chic


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What is the Urban Dictionary “noun trend” and why is it popular? https://phuutthai.com/what-is-the-urban-dictionary-noun-trend-and-why-is-it-popular/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 14:55:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/what-is-the-urban-dictionary-noun-trend-and-why-is-it-popular/ They let the dictionary define them as a person. Urban Dictionary is often seen as a sophomoric source for dirty words, but now bored social media users have tapped into the participatory glossary for something new – to find alternate definitions for their names that aren’t in the list. Oxford English Dictionary. The bizarre name […]]]>


They let the dictionary define them as a person.

Urban Dictionary is often seen as a sophomoric source for dirty words, but now bored social media users have tapped into the participatory glossary for something new – to find alternate definitions for their names that aren’t in the list. Oxford English Dictionary. The bizarre name game is currently going viral as users flock to Twitter to share the results.

The online journey of self-discovery is simple: just type in your name and generate a plethora of hilarious nickname meanings. For example, “Ben” – a Hebrew word meaning “son of the right hand” – is defined by Urban Dictionary like “a cute, tall, dark, handsome boy” that you can “take to your mom”. Or, depending on the top-rated entry with 1,415 upvotes, a “duck overlord” who “can mind-control ducks of all kinds.”

By a similar sign, a Twitter user named Johanna was delighted to find that her name was synonymous with “one of the most angelic people you could meet,” among other flattering definitions.

Ben, as defined by the top entry in Urban Dictionary.

Meanwhile, one of the top-rated Urban Dictionary definitions for Brandi was “sickest, funniest chick you’ve ever met,” by another tweet.

“She loves rough and free drama,” the submission read. “She is very sensual and affectionate. Non-materialist and she chooses her friends as she picks her fruit. She’s hard to anger, but once she is angry, beware.

UD enthusiasts shared the results on Twitter.
UD enthusiasts shared the results on Twitter.

And the viral vocabulary collection doesn’t discriminate against more diverse names. According to another tweet, which a satisfied user captioned “The urban dictionary only says facts”, the Korean name Junho means “a sexy Korean with a big a-.”

Of course, many Twitter users weren’t too impressed with the etymological pursuit, which they found a bit self-congratulating by nature.

“No offense, but absolutely no one reads the names of your urban dictionaries” mocked a critic on Twitter.

Another prankster posted a screenshot for an urban dictionary entry for Elijah, who was defined as someone who “don’t give out what your names mean on Urban Dictionary.”

Urban Dictionary did not discriminate against foreign sounding names.
Urban Dictionary did not discriminate against foreign sounding names.

Of course, not all terms have such a complementary connotation on the street slang site. For example, just like on Twitter and elsewhere, the majority of UD entries define “Karen” as a white woman titled – “typically blonde” – complaining to authority figures on the slightest inconvenience that does not affect him “even remotely”.

Not all definitions were so flattering.
Not all definitions were so flattering.



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Words for good politicians are hard to find in the dictionary – Susie Dent https://phuutthai.com/words-for-good-politicians-are-hard-to-find-in-the-dictionary-susie-dent/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:17:25 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/words-for-good-politicians-are-hard-to-find-in-the-dictionary-susie-dent/ The House of Commons: When it was discovered that former Cabinet Minister Owen Paterson had violated lobbying rules and rules of conduct for MPs, the term “sleaze” was a linguistic slam-dunk à la both for the opposition and the media, writes Susie Dent. The sound of sleaze fits his definition perfectly – it’s smooth, rippling, […]]]>


The House of Commons: When it was discovered that former Cabinet Minister Owen Paterson had violated lobbying rules and rules of conduct for MPs, the term “sleaze” was a linguistic slam-dunk à la both for the opposition and the media, writes Susie Dent.

The sound of sleaze fits his definition perfectly – it’s smooth, rippling, and suggestively seedy. He’s also climbing the language charts, oozing politics again. With him comes an accompanying lexicon of obscenity which confirms that he never really disappeared.

“Sleaze” has turned out to be a remarkably elastic term. It lends itself just as well to illicit business or a vice of any kind as it does to financial scandals and expenditure scandals. It encompasses work and nepotism, cronyism and simple lies. When Owen Paterson was convicted of breaking the lobbying rules and the rules of conduct for MPs, the term was a linguistic slam-dunk to both the opposition and the media.

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Sleaze’s own story isn’t that simple: In its early days, the word was much more about fragility than dirt. It started as a spinoff from “sleazy”, which was first recorded in the 1640s in the writings of Sir Kenelm Digby, philosopher and courtier of Charles I. Digby uses “sleazy” to describe the distillation of certain spirits, which “are in themselves as hairy or silty, that is to say they have small downy parts, as we see on the feet of flies.”

Read more

Read more

Tinder personality descriptions could be animated with words like bellibon, cl …

The paws of the insects may seem easily reminiscent of the limbs stretched out on the benches by some members of the House of Commons, but the emphasis here is on vagueness and, by extension, things without substance. It wasn’t until the 1940s that the implications of sordidity crept in.

The etymology of sleaze is also perfectly slippery. A popular suggestion is that it starts with “Sleazy Cloth,” in which “sleazy” was slang for Silesia, a region now in southwestern Poland that was once famous for the production of fine textiles. “Silesia” itself has become a generic term for high quality, and so “sordid” fabric was originally anything but sordid. Like some members of Parliament, its reputation was not to last, and it was knock-offs at a reduced price that ultimately did.

Sleazy eventually got hooked on cheap knockoffs of the real thing: sordid in every way.

A similar word in the Sleaze lexicon, whose frequency in linguistic graphics is increasingly rapid, is “tawdry”. It also formerly referred to the fabric, this time commemorating Ely’s patroness, Ethelreda, known as Saint Audrey. The stalls sold fine lace necklaces and ribbons known as “St Audrey’s lace” – “tacky lace” when pronounced quickly. As the quality of the fair’s adornments declined, the “tawdry” remained on the cheap and low-quality side of life.

In the 14th century, those who exhibited fraudulent behavior in public life would have been called “corrumpent”, from the Latin cor, “together”, and rumpere, “to break, violate or destroy”. They are the breakers of the laws that they themselves helped to put in place, rendering them unnecessary. Corrupting was to spread corruption or, as the Oxford English Dictionary says, “to putrid”; it was eventually replaced by “corrupt”, whose first meaning was also “to rot”, like spoiled fruit. A powerful word, it also applied to anyone so debased in character that they were believed to have been infected with evil.

The dictionary also gives us a specific term for corruption in the job, office or position of trust. It is the 16th century “embezzlement”, from the Latin maleversari, “to act badly”. There are many examples of its use throughout history, such as in a letter from the Duke of Wellington in 1811 complaining that “this malfeasance in office, this neglect of duty … has gone unnoticed”. Not so unnoticed fifty years later, when John Richard Green notes in A short history of the English people that “Charges of embezzlement and corruption have been leveled against members of the House”.

Green was writing at a time, much like ours, when business and personal interests were seen as a distortion of government policy and policy, leading to strong waves of anti-corruption sentiment and new calls for legislation. The Reform Act of 1832 was intended to clear up the electoral system, but even in its early days the London and Westminster Review lamented the fact that “already … the envious goddess of corruption has sent two deadliest serpents, corruption and intimidation, to strangle the baby-giant “. The serpent metaphor is also played invisibly in “extortion”, which comes from the Latin torquere, to twist or squeeze hard.

Corruption has been known by a variety of other names in the past, from boodlerism to palmistry and, of course, “blackmail,” which was originally a form of protection racketeering. 16th-century Scottish chiefs regularly demanded money from farmers and small landowners in the border counties of England and Scotland, in return for protection or immunity from plunder. “Mail” here comes from an old Scandinavian word mál, meaning “speech, agreement”, while “black” was a nasty riff on “white money”, the silver coins in which legitimate rents were paid. .

Lobbying, meanwhile, takes its name from the physical lobbies of the US and UK legislative assemblies where ministers meet to vote and where talks between members and non-members of the House take place. From this was born the involvement of paid advocacy and the search for favors by those with private or commercial interests.

It’s a collection of sordid words, perhaps matched only by the list of epithets for those in office who are themselves mired in sordid. Words like “snollygoster”: a politician for his own gain, or a “quockerwodger”: one whose strings are fully pulled by someone else. If only we had a comparable lexicon for those with integrity and honesty, who are unfairly involved in the midst of vulgarity. Words for good politicians are hard to find in the dictionary, suggesting that fairness has long been stifled by ambition.

But then “ambition” itself arose in politics, a nod to the Roman electoral hopes who would roam the city to display their credentials. Their gowns were always bright white, candidus in Latin, as an outward display of purity – we received the word “candidate” from them. It seems that the sordid web of politics has come undone from the start.

-Susie Dent is a lexicographer and etymologist. She has appeared in Dictionary Corner on Countdown since 1992. Her book, Word Perfect: Etymological Entertainment for Every Day of the Year, is now available.

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“Vax” named word of the year by the Oxford English Dictionary https://phuutthai.com/vax-named-word-of-the-year-by-the-oxford-english-dictionary/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/vax-named-word-of-the-year-by-the-oxford-english-dictionary/ The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) has revealed its word of the year for 2021: vax, with usage 72 times higher than last year. The dictionary noted a significant increase in the number of vaccine-related words and phrases over the past 12 months, including: “double vaxxed”, “unvaxxed” and “anti-vaxxer”. Another related term that has gained popularity […]]]>


The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) has revealed its word of the year for 2021: vax, with usage 72 times higher than last year.

The dictionary noted a significant increase in the number of vaccine-related words and phrases over the past 12 months, including: “double vaxxed”, “unvaxxed” and “anti-vaxxer”.

Another related term that has gained popularity is ‘vaxxia’, which refers to a photo of yourself taken while receiving a vaccine, but more specifically against Covid-19.

OED editor-in-chief Fiona McPherson said “vax” was a clear choice as the word of the year for 2021 because it had “the most striking impact.”

“It dates back to at least the 1980s, but according to our corpus it was rarely used until this year,” she added.

“When you add to that his versatility in forming other words – vaxxia, vax-a-thon, vaxinista – it became clear that vax was the flagship of the crowd.”

Casper Grathwohl, President of Oxford Languages, added: “When reviewing the linguistic evidence, ‘vax’ emerged as an obvious choice. The dramatic spike in the use of the word caught our attention first.

“Then we did the analysis and a story started to emerge revealing how the vax was at the center of our minds this year. “

Talk to The GuardianGrathwohl noted that the use of the word is also increasing in unexpected places, like on dating apps.

“The evidence was everywhere, from dating apps (vax 4 vax) and pent up frustrations (hot vax summer) to academic calendars (vaxx at school) and bureaucratic operations (vax pass),” he said. .

“By monopolizing our talk, it is clear that the language of vaccines is changing the way we talk – and think – about public health, the community and ourselves. “

The word “vax” was first recorded in English in 1799; its vaccine and vaccination derivatives both appeared for the first time in 1800.

OED’s Word of the Year is a word or phrase that the dictionary has found has garnered a lot of interest over the past 12 months.

“Each year, we debate the nominees for the word of the year and choose a winner who is judged to reflect that particular year’s ethics, mood or concerns and have lasting potential as a word of importance. cultural “, he says on his website.

In 2020, OED made the unusual choice of choosing a selection of words as its word of the year, explaining that it was impossible to name a single word to sum up those 12 months.

Among the words chosen were leave, bushfires, WFH, lockdown and moonshot.


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National Dictionary Day: Surprising Facts About The Resource Book https://phuutthai.com/national-dictionary-day-surprising-facts-about-the-resource-book/ https://phuutthai.com/national-dictionary-day-surprising-facts-about-the-resource-book/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/national-dictionary-day-surprising-facts-about-the-resource-book/ Saturday is National Dictionary Day and what better way to celebrate than to learn some facts about the reference book? The United States celebrates National Dictionary Day on October 16 each year in honor of the birthday of Noah Webster, considered the father of the American dictionary, according to Merriam webster. According to the dictionary […]]]>


Saturday is National Dictionary Day and what better way to celebrate than to learn some facts about the reference book?

The United States celebrates National Dictionary Day on October 16 each year in honor of the birthday of Noah Webster, considered the father of the American dictionary, according to Merriam webster.

According to the dictionary website, National Dictionary Day “celebrates the language, emphasizes the importance of learning, and encourages readers to use the dictionary to improve their vocabulary.”

Saturday is National Dictionary Day. The United States celebrates the holiday on October 16 each year in honor of Noah Webster’s birthday. Webster is considered the father of the American dictionary. (iStock)

The website has ways to celebrate, including playing word games like crossword puzzles or word searches, hosting a spelling contest, or learning a new word.

You can also celebrate by reading these interesting facts on the dictionary.

A RARE COPY OF THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION AT AUCTION IS EXPECTED AT $ 15M

The first English language dictionary was established in 1604

Robert Cawdry published “A Table Alphabeticall” in 1604, making it the “first monolingual English dictionary ever published”, according to the British Library. The resource book contained approximately 3,000 words and “short, simple descriptions”.

The first <a class=English language dictionary was published in 1604 and the first American dictionary was published in 1806. (iStock)”/>

The first English language dictionary was published in 1604 and the first American dictionary was published in 1806. (iStock)

The first American dictionary – “A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language” – was published in 1806 by Noah Webster, according to the Merriam Webster website.

In 1828 Webster published “An American Dictionary of the English Language,” which had 70,000 entries.

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No English dictionary contains all the words of the English language

According to Merriam-Webster, it is silly to rely on a single dictionary to hold all the words in the English language, even though dictionaries “tend to be quite large books.”

“There never was, and never will be, a dictionary that includes all words in English,” Merriam-Webster said on her website.

According to the dictionary, some dictionaries omit words that are outdated or irrelevant to most people.

Microscopic pneumonoultramilicovolcanoconiosis is generally considered to be the longest word in the English language, with 45 letters.  (iStock)

Microscopic pneumonoultramilicovolcanoconiosis is generally considered to be the longest word in the English language, with 45 letters. (iStock)

Words are not decided by lexicographers

According to Merriam Webster website, different dictionaries have different criteria for adding words. However, the general rule for adding or removing a word from the dictionary depends on the data surrounding how often a word is used.

“If enough people use a certain word in a certain way for a while (or if it has substantial currency in a particular field, like medicine), it will be added to a dictionary,” writes Merriam-Webster on its website. .

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The longest word in the English language has 45 letters

Microscopic pneumonoultramilicovolcanoconiosis is generally considered to be the longest word in the English language, with 45 letters. The word refers to lung disease, according to Lexicon.

Other words considered to be among the longest in the dictionary are anti-disestablishmentarianism (a 28-letter word referring to “opposition to a break with an established church”, according to Dictionary.com) and floccinaucinihilipilification (a 29 letter word meaning “the estimation of something as worthless”, according to Dictionary.com).

Eunoia, which means "nice thought" according to Guinness World Records, is the shortest word in the English language which has the five main vowels.  (iStock)

Eunoia, which means “beautiful thought” according to Guinness World Records, is the shortest word in the English language which has all five main vowels. (iStock)

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The shortest word with the five vowels in the English language is only 6 letters long

Eunoia, which means “beautiful thought” according to Guinness World Records, is the shortest word in the English language which has the five main vowels.

Of course, the two shortest words in the entire English language are “I” and “a”, with only one letter each. According to Lexicon, there are 103 two-letter words.


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25 of the new words Merriam-Webster is adding to the dictionary in 2018 https://phuutthai.com/25-of-the-new-words-merriam-webster-is-adding-to-the-dictionary-in-2018/ https://phuutthai.com/25-of-the-new-words-merriam-webster-is-adding-to-the-dictionary-in-2018/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/25-of-the-new-words-merriam-webster-is-adding-to-the-dictionary-in-2018/ If you don’t spend most of your time on the internet, it can be difficult to keep up with the changing jargon of the digital age. Fortunately, the editors of Merriam webster have done the hard work of keeping track of the most important new terms to know: The American institution has added more than […]]]>


If you don’t spend most of your time on the internet, it can be difficult to keep up with the changing jargon of the digital age. Fortunately, the editors of Merriam webster have done the hard work of keeping track of the most important new terms to know: The American institution has added more than 840 new words to its dictionary, many of which did not exist a few decades ago.

Readers who are fluent in the Internet will be familiar with many of the list entries, and there are also many new words specific to the tech world. Not all words new to the dictionary are necessarily new to the language; Merriam-Webster now includes culinary terms that have been around for some time, and the new list also features common word abbreviations. Check out a sample of the new entries below.

1. CANDLE (ADJ.)

Short for bourgeois, this term means “marked by a concern for wealth, possessions and respectability”.

2. TL; DR (ABBREV.)

” Too long ; I haven’t read – I used to say that something would take too long to read. “

3. BINGEABLE (ADJ.)

“Have multiple episodes or parts that can be watched in quick succession.”

4. PREDICTIVE (ADJ.)

A sin predictive text: “Of, relating to, or usable or valuable for prediction.”

5. HAPTIC (NOT.)

“The use of electronically or mechanically generated movement that a user experiences through the sense of touch as part of an interface (such as on a game console or smartphone).”

6. FORCE TO EXIT (V.)

“To force (an unresponsive computer program) to stop (such as using a series of preset keystrokes).”

7. AIRPLANE MODE (NOT.)

“A mode of operation for an electronic device (such as a mobile phone) in which the device does not connect to wireless networks and cannot send or receive communications (such as calls or SMS) or access to the Internet but can still be used for other functions. “

8. INSTAGRAM (V.)

“To post (a photo) on the Instagram photo sharing service.”

9. BIOHACKING (NOT.)

“Biological experimentation (such as through gene editing or the use of drugs or implants) performed to improve the qualities or capabilities of living organisms, especially by individuals and groups outside of a research environment traditional medical or scientific. “

ten. FINTECH (NOT.)

“Products and companies that use newly developed digital and online technologies in the banking and financial services industries. “

11. MARG (NOT.)

A margarita. According to Merriam-Webster, the first known use was in 1990.

12. FAVORITES (NOT.)

Favorite. This word is older than it seems: it dates from 1938. (“Lester Harding, the big favorite here, clicks with pop songs”, was the first usage, according to in the Oxford English Dictionary.)

13. LOVES (ADJ.)

“Extremely charming or attractive: adorable.”

14. HIKING (NOT.)

According to Merriam-Webster, this “often derogatory” slang means “A random person: someone who is not known or recognizable or whose appearance (such as in a conversation or story) seems spontaneous or unwanted.”

15. GUAC (NOT.)

Guacamole.

16. IFTAR (NOT.)

“A meal eaten by Muslims at sunset to break the daily fast during Ramadan.”

17. GOCHUJANG (NOT.)

Spicy paste used in Korean cuisine made with red peppers, sticky rice and fermented soybeans.

18. ESTABLISHMENT (NOT.)

“A culinary process in which ingredients are prepared and organized (like in a restaurant kitchen) before cooking.”

19. HOP (NOT.)

Originally a slang word for an addict dating back to 1883, this word today means “A beer lover”.

20. ZOODLE (NOT.)

“A long, thin strip of zucchini that looks like a string or a narrow ribbon of pasta.”

21. HANGRY (ADJ.)

“Irritable or angry with hunger.” People have been hungry (or at least use the word) since 1956.

22. MOCKTAIL (NOT.)

“A generally ice-cold drink made from a variety of ingredients (such as juice, herbs and sparkling water) but without alcohol: a non-alcoholic cocktail.”

23. LATINX (ADJ.)

“From, related to or marked by Latin American heritage – used as a non-sexist alternative to Latino or Latina.”

24. GENERATION Z (NOT.)

The generation of people born in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

25. CITY TENT (NOT.)

“A set of many tents set up in an area to provide generally temporary shelter (such as for the displaced or homeless).”


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25 new non-color words have just been added to the Oxford English dictionary https://phuutthai.com/25-new-non-color-words-have-just-been-added-to-the-oxford-english-dictionary/ https://phuutthai.com/25-new-non-color-words-have-just-been-added-to-the-oxford-english-dictionary/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://phuutthai.com/25-new-non-color-words-have-just-been-added-to-the-oxford-english-dictionary/ The Oxford English Dictionary is an institution almost 135 years old, but it is no better than recognizing distorted terminology once it enters the popular lexicon. Buttmunch, assfuck, and douchebaggery are just a few fun examples of the more than 1,400 new words added to the dictionary this quarter. According to Quartz, keeping the dictionary […]]]>


The Oxford English Dictionary is an institution almost 135 years old, but it is no better than recognizing distorted terminology once it enters the popular lexicon. Buttmunch, assfuck, and douchebaggery are just a few fun examples of the more than 1,400 new words added to the dictionary this quarter.

According to Quartz, keeping the dictionary up to date is a never-ending process at DEO. In addition to examining language trends for general new words to add, publishers evaluate a portion of the book each quarter to determine if any new additions or variations need to be included. This time around they gave us a bunch of delicious new entrees including d-bag, idiocracy, ass-end, well, stopper.

Editors also review words that fall under a different theme each quarter. After examining the terms related to cinema and cinema that have gained traction over the years, the editors decided to make Kubrickian, Indiana Jones, Mrs. Robinson, Oscar bait, and no more official dictionary.

You can check out some of the highlights of the new entries below and read the full list. here.

1. assfuck
2. buttocks
3. ass-end
4. ass kicker
5. without ass
6. Bobbitt
7. hogwash
8. blah
9. bogey
ten. boogie
11. butt crunch
12. bump and grind
13. dead end
14. buttery face
15. end to end
16. asshole
17. booty
18. assfuck
19. d-bag
20. douchebaggery
21. dumbass
22. idiocracy
23. jabroni
24. lumberjack
25. sloppy seconds

[h/t Quartz]


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